Beat the Heat this Summer: Tips for Staying Cool When the Weather Heats Up

This summer is a hot one. Are you staying cool? Many truckers find it difficult to beat the heat when faced with anti-idling laws and rising temperatures. This guide will help you get through summer in a little more comfort. What are your favorite ways to stay cool when the temperatures skyrocket?

Limit Your Sun Exposure

When you can, limit your direct sun exposure. Wear sunglasses as you drive and when you’re out of the truck, securing a load for example, cover up. A hat and a lightweight long sleeve shirt (light colors are best) can really cut down on sun exposure.

Plan Your Schedule Around Temperature

If you have any control over your schedule try to plan your day around the temperature. Opt for loading and unloading during the early morning or evening hours when it is cooler outside. Try to stick to a traditional sleep schedule, sleeping at night when the temperature drops. Drive during the hottest hours of the day when you can freely use air conditioning to cool your truck.

Use Auxiliary Power

Due to anti-idling laws many trucks are now equipped with auxiliary power, allowing you to run the air, even when you’re not driving. If your truck has this option, use it. If not, pay careful attention to temperature, especially if you’re going to sleep during the day. A parked truck can heat up quickly. A truck stop or hotel room may be necessary on those hottest days for safety. A battery-powered fan can help you stay cool on warm, but not hot nights.

Visit the Truck Stop

Don’t have an auxiliary power unit? On hot nights you may want to find a truck stop with full hookups. Many of these truck stops offer air conditioning hookups, allowing you to stay cool without keeping the truck on.

Fill Your Cooler

Staying hydrated is essential during hot weather and it is easier to do when you have lots of fluids on hand. Start each morning with a cooler filled with drinks (invest in ice as needed). Drink throughout the day to avoid dehydration. By the time you get thirsty, you’re already slightly dehydrated. Drink extra fluids before, during, and after time in the heat.

Know the Signs of Heat Stroke

Heat exhaustion is common on a hot day. Watch for its signs and take action to cool off if you’re experiencing them. Heat exhaustion can lead to heat stroke, a serious illness that can result in death. If you experience signs of heat stroke, seek medical help immediately.

 

Signs of Heat Exhaustion:

  • Dizziness
  • Headache
  • Sweaty Skin
  • Weakness
  • Cramping
  • Nausea or Vomiting
  • Fast Heartbeat

 

Signs of Heat Stroke:

  • Red, hot, dry skin
  • Increased Temperature
  • Confusion
  • Convulsions
  • Fainting

Watch out for your fellow truckers too. If you’re working around someone who has signs of heat exhaustion or heat stroke, get them some help. There’s nothing wrong with taking a break when your body is feeling overheated.

Beat the heat this summer and stay safe. We want you to Travel with Care.

 

 

 

Stop Smoking and Drive Healthier: 5 Resources for Quitting on the Road

Odds are, you’re a smoker. Most truckers are, just about 51%. As you well know, smoking is terrible for your health and quitting is hard. Make a healthier choice for yourself and quit smoking. These resources can help.

There is no one guaranteed solution for quitting smoking. Find resources that look like they will help you and try them. If it isn’t working, try something else. Stick to your goal and don’t give up. Quitting is possible and you can do it. Make the decision to quit today and then find a plan to make it happen.

1-800-QUIT-NOW

All states have a dedicated quitline to help smokers as they decide to quit. Services available and hours will vary by state. Call 1-800-QUIT-NOW to get in touch with your state’s quitline. Another available option is 877-44U-QUIT, available Mon-Fri from 8 a.m. to 11 p.m. Eastern time.

Freedom from Smoking Online

Support groups are an excellent resource as you quit an addictive habit, but many drivers, especially long haul and over the road truckers, may have a hard time hitting a weekly meeting due to their varied schedule and time on the road. Freedom from Smoking Online is an adaptation of the American Lung Association’s highly successful group program. It can be done on your own time, from anywhere with an internet connection. There is a small fee to register for the program, but with all the money you’ll save when you no longer buy cigarettes, this program is very affordable and is an excellent option for those wanting a group style program without the weekly, in-person meetings.

Smokefree TXT

Are you running low on data? Do you want support without having to use the internet? Smokefree TXT provides 24/7 support and encouragement for those that are trying to quit. Each day you’ll receive approximately five encouraging text messages, helping you to stay on track. To sign up visit https://smokefree.gov/tools-tips/smokefreetxt

Quit Day

QuitDay.org hopes to add 10 healthy years to your life by helping you to ditch the cigarettes. Their website will help you understand why you smoke and will help you identify common setbacks met during the quitting process. They have a page specially dedicated to helping truck drivers quit smoking.

Apps for Quitting

Are you an app lover? Use one of these free apps to help you quit (links are to Android apps, but Apple versions are available too):

Tips for Success

Quitting smoking can be especially difficult for truck drivers. You spend hours alone driving, time that you probably filled with cigarettes. These tips may be helpful.

  • Try Sunflower Seeds and Gum– Many truckers find it helpful to stock up on sunflower seeds and gum for those long, boring stretches where you’re used to smoking. Make sure you have something to do as you drive so you can break the smoking habit with a healthier option.
  • Talk with Your Doctor– Your doctor may be able to prescribe treatments to reduce your urge to smoke. Ask them about your options.
  • Get a Buddy– Everything is more fun when you do it with a friend. A quit buddy may make it easier to stop smoking. This resource guide from the University of Alabama will help you enlist a family member, friend, or fellow trucker for help on your quitting journey.
  • Do it for You– Quitting is hard and the only way to be successful is to want it. Why do you want to quit? Remind yourself of the reasons that you’re quitting every time the going gets hard.

Live longer and feel better. You might drive a truck, but that doesn’t mean you have to smoke like a trucker. Quit smoking today!