What to Discuss During a Trucking Safety Meeting

Letting your drivers know that safety is key to success is imperative when running a large or small fleet. One of the most common ways to do this is to hold regular safety meetings where instruction, safety talks, innovative ideas, discussion and policies may all be reviewed

Professional drivers are, in actuality, some of the safest on the roads when compared mile for mile to drivers of automobiles. Not only do they know how to evaluate traffic, control their speed and yield repeatedly, they know that their safety, and that of other drivers on the road may depend on how well they can do their job. Introducing safety videos and holding regular driver safety meetings can reinforce policy, provide new and innovative ideas and remind drivers of required industry standards.

Fleet Policy

Without a stated fleet policy, it is impossible to have a continued company commitment to that policy. A fleet policy should be more than just a set of rules. Instead, it should be written to encourage drivers to engage in a safer driving culture.  Some items in many fleet policies include:

  • Company commitment to safe driver training
  • Driver seat belt policy
  • Definition of driver personal use allowance
  • Expectations for MVR reviews
  • Committee set up to review accidents

Having such safety policies such as these in place is only a small part of making it part of your fleet culture. To do this, management must communicate frequently and positively about each facet of the policy being sure to follow the policy when drivers face both negative and positive consequences.

Ongoing Communication

Driving a semi can be a long and lonely job. Communicating with your drivers can help them feel as if they are truly part of your team. These communications can include tips on getting enough sleep or drinking enough water, a truck related joke of the day, a shout-out to drivers who have exceeded expectations and reminders about safety.  Attaching a safety-related email signature can also ensure that the drivers get the safety message without feeling overwhelmed by it.

Conference calls are another way to communicate with over the road drivers about safety items. Though drivers are not legally allowed to manipulate a cell phone while operating a vehicle, a good Bluetooth headset can make such conference calls easy to attend while on the road.

Many drivers thrive on competition, so company-wide contests that recognize a driver’s commitment to safety are a great idea. The fact that they might increase a driver’s awareness of safety is even better.

Safe Trucks

Let your truck drivers know that the vehicles they are driving are safe. For instance, letting each driver in the fleet know about the tire review and replacement policy may help to put their minds at ease. Nothing is worse for a professional driver as having to wonder when a tire will blow on the freeway, and how far the pieces will fly. By letting your drivers know that you understand their safety concerns about tire wear and tear, you will help your drivers feel safer.

Along with tires, each vehicle in the fleet should undergo routine maintenance, and each driver should be familiar with the schedule. By updating your drivers on this type of maintenance, they will know that they need not worry about the next safety inspection or oil change because you have their vehicle covered.

Insistence on Safe Habits

A fleet policy should always include a discussion about the importance of safe trucking habits. Not only do these fleet safety talks show that managers value the truck and the load, but also the safety of each and every driver. One habit that many drivers forgo is wearing a seatbelt. Managers can use many different reminders, safe driving videos, incentives and tabulations to help drivers remember the real importance of seatbelts in a truck and in a personal vehicle. Managers may also want to remind drivers that seatbelts help everyone on the road, not just the truck driver.

Recognize Safety

Making sure to recognize safe drivers and reward their efforts publicly can help to increase the overall safety of the fleet. Such rewards might include having no traffic violations, no accidents or now insurance claims. Ongoing records of safety such as many years with no accidents or violations should be recognized and rewarded with larger rewards such as paid time off or short paid vacations.

Having a stated safety policy is the most important item on the list for encouraging safety. Making time for regular truck safety meetings runs a close second. Let your drivers know that it is worth the time to learn about how all can be safer as they cross the byways and highways of the United States.

How Owner Operators Can Reduce the Headache of Bookkeeping

While you might enjoy being the owner and operator of your very own trucking business, you may feel you can do without the accounting and bookkeeping aspect of the job. Luckily, you don’t have to become a master of record-keeping to handle your company’s finances. Here are few tips to get you up and running.

Make It a Daily Practice

Do yourself a favor and get into the habit of carving out time every day to handle owner operator expenses. It’s easy to leave the task for tomorrow or the weekend, but doing so just makes the work pile up more and more. Not only does daily bookkeeping make your life easier, you’ll also have a more accurate picture of how your business is doing so you can plan and adjust accordingly. After all, you don’t want to make business or financial decisions for tomorrow when you don’t have a clear picture of what happened yesterday.

Use the Right Software

There are more bookkeeping and accounting software options available than ever before. Explore your options to decide the best fit for you and your business. Specifically, you might be better off with a cash-based system that allows you to count your income as you receive payments and your expenses as you take care of them. Don’t be afraid to try out different types of software (especially if there are free trial offers) until you find one that’s a solid fit for you.

Consider Going Digital

Because paperwork can take up a great deal of space and become cumbersome to organize adding even more time to your day-to-day workload, go digital when it comes to keeping up with financial documents. This is an especially great idea if there’s already an abundance of paperwork you have to deal with on a daily basis. Keep all those invoices and bank statements on a cloud where you can easily and quickly access them from a computer, tablet or smartphone.

Learn How to Properly Manage Your Cash Flow

One of the first things you should learn when it comes to bookkeeping is the ins and outs of cash flow. Knowing how much money you have available right now can mean the difference between paying your suppliers and employees on time and getting hit with late fees or having team members quit on you. Money or payments you have coming later in the month won’t do you much good right now, especially because those future payments might be delayed.

Prepare for Audits Before They Happen

As a business owner, the last thing you want to deal with is the IRS sniffing around. Bookkeeping for truck drivers involves a great deal of preparation, including audits. Head trouble off at the pass by keeping your personal expenses and accounts separate from your business expenses and accounts. Get and save the receipts for every purchase you make on behalf of your business, no matter how insubstantial that purchase might be. You never know when you’ll need them either for yourself, or for an audit.

Get a Business Credit Card

Business credit cards are a solid idea as you work on keeping your business finances separate from your personal finances, mainly because you’ll have fewer monthly statements and paperwork to keep up with, even if you are going digital. While you can always keep track of your receipts, using a credit card cuts down on time and can make your life that much easier.

Don’t Forget About Tax Deductibles

Speaking of the IRS, don’t forget to look into tax deductibles and write-offs when you’re buying office equipment. For instance, some computers, printers, company vehicles and business software might qualify for tax deductibles. When it’s time to buy equipment for your business, it’s a good idea to have a list of qualifying brands and models that qualify for deductibles before you start shopping.

Bring In the Pros

As stated earlier, there are plenty of accounting and bookkeeping software options for business owners to take advantage of, but nothing beats the advice and insight of a professional accountant who’s familiar with how the trucking industry works. Should you ever feel you’re in over your head when it comes to keeping up with your trucking company’s financial health, or if you have a question you can’t find the answer to, turn to a professional.

Even if you do have an easy time keeping up with your business accounting, it’s still a good idea to check in with a professional accountant a few times throughout the year for financial advice, and to make sure you’re doing everything right. You don’t want to find out the hard way that your business isn’t doing nearly as good as you might have thought.

Bookkeeping is made easier when you have the right tips, software and expert help. Fulfil your business potential by taking care of your company’s financial health. Best of luck!

Simple and Delicious Meal Prep Ideas for Truck Drivers

Living a healthy lifestyle and consuming nutritious foods on a regular basis can be a real challenge for those who spend the majority of their time on the road. The stress of irregular work hours and the difficulty of finding fresh, healthy food can make meal prep for truck drivers a nightmare. However, preparing easy meals for truckers can be simple, especially with a bit of preparation and strategy.

Fresh Vegetables

When deciding on food to pack for truck drivers, vegetables are often an easy and delicious choice. They are relatively affordable, high in nutritional value, and easy to find, and as long as you have access to a refrigerator, they are perfect for long-haul trips. Try packing one or more of the following types of vegetables before your next trip:

  • Carrot sticks
  • Broccoli
  • Zucchini
  • Cucumbers
  • Celery

If you find yourself getting bored with your normal vegetable routine, try adding a bit of peanut or almond butter to your celery. Some vegetables will taste even better when tossed with your favorite seasonings or vinaigrette dressing. Just be sure your vegetables are fresh and you don’t drown your vegetables in calorically dense dressings and nut butter.

Fresh Fruit

Much like fresh vegetables, fresh fruits such as apples, bananas, oranges, and grapes can be tasty and nutritious at the same time. Consuming fruits regularly is a great way to stay hydrated and obtain the important vitamins and nutrients your body needs to stay energized and healthy. When choosing fresh fruit, try to avoid fruits that are bruised or dull in color. If you absolutely cannot find fresh fruit near you, look for fruit cups that contain juice instead of high-fructose corn syrup.

Nuts and Seeds

Raw nuts and seeds such as almonds, cashews, and sunflower seeds are high in protein, fiber, and “good” unsaturated fats. Many of them also contain omega-3 fatty acids, which can lower your chances of heart problems, as well as vitamin E, which can help reduce the amount of plaque that accumulates in your arteries. Roasted seeds are known to be an excellent source of zinc, which has been proven to be beneficial for men’s health. When choosing nuts and seeds, try to avoid items packed in salt, and consume them sparingly—even though they are nutritious, they are still high in fat. If you are really craving something sweet and salty, try making your own homemade trail mix by adding dried fruits and a bit of chocolate to the nuts of your choice.

Boiled Eggs

Eggs are packed full of nutrients, and they are relatively simple to prepare. Eggs are high in protein, vitamin D, iron, and vitamin B2. Their whites also contain nutrients such as selenium and cholesterol, and many brands of eggs now contain omega-3 fatty acids, which can keep your heart healthy and lower your risk of heart attack and stroke. Boiled eggs will also store well as long as they are kept at a safe temperature.

Greek Yogurt

The nutritional value of many types of yogurts can be questionable, but Greek yogurt is high in protein, and many types are low in sugar. Most brands of Greek yogurt contain anywhere from eight to 12 grams of protein, as well as considerable levels of calcium and vitamin D. The cultures contained in yogurt have also been known to aid in digestive health and regularity. With so much to offer, consuming Greek yogurt is the perfect way to handle your ice cream cravings.

Protein Bars

Protein bars are a popular healthy snack, and they can be found in virtually every grocery store in the country. Once only consumed by bodybuilders and fitness enthusiasts, protein bars have become mainstream and are often substituted for entire meals. They contain relatively high amounts of protein and come in a wide variety of flavors and textures. When choosing a protein bar, be sure to carefully examine the fat and sugar content before making a final decision. In an effort to boost sales and appeal to a wider variety of palates, many protein bar manufacturers have opted to add unhealthy amounts of sugar and fat to their products. These types of protein bars can be immensely unhealthy when consumed on a regular basis.

Muffins

Contrary to popular belief, muffins can be tasty and nutritious. They also store well, making them ideal for long trips. In general, homemade muffins that incorporate fresh oats, nuts, fruits, and seeds tend to be significantly healthier than prepackaged grocery store and coffee shop muffins. They are much lower in sugar, and many people add healthy add-ins such as protein powder to increase the nutritional value.

The Importance of Planning Ahead

As mentioned above, meal prep for truck drivers can be simple with just a bit of preparation and planning. High-calorie, sugar-laden foods may be more convenient, but your body will thank you if you choose to consume the healthier options listed above instead. To make meal preparation easier, try packing items that store well before your trip so you don’t have to keep running to the store.

Recognizing and Preventing Depression in Truck Drivers

All too often, the reality of life on the open road does not measure up to a driver’s expectations. Many new drivers are lured into the field with promises of big money, time at home, paid time off and on-the-job training. Once the newness of the job has worn off, however, reality begins to take a toll on a driver’s mental health.

Hardships of Over The Road Driving

In truth, driving a semi truck full time is an incredibly difficult job. The term “road warriors” is very fitting once the hardships are factored in. Depression in truck drivers can be the end result for many who are unprepared for the realities of life in an 18-wheeler. Some of these hardships include:

  1. Loneliness – The life of a trucker is lonely and solitary as drivers spend hundreds of thousands of miles each year behind the wheel. Yes, Bluetooth headsets enable drivers to reach out to family and friends and chat as they make their way across the state or country, but when each phone call is over, the driver may still feel isolated.
  2. Lower than expected pay – Many drivers have taken on this type of job in an effort to help with bills at home. When they find out that their pay is not as much as they were promised, many drivers feel trapped in a career choice that they do not know how to get out of.
  3. Poor nutrition – Studies about the link between nutrition and mental health have been performed for years and findings usually state that eating less nutritious foods leads to declining mental health of truck drivers and feelings of overall happiness. Drivers who spend much of their time on the road have a difficult time eating healthy foods, and may have more depression because of it.
  4. Feeling of powerlessness – Though many drivers are in the job to help out with expenses at home, they often feel as if they cannot do enough from the driver’s seat to actually help with things that are going on at home. When they find that loved ones are ill, that cars have broken down or that there is a home repair waiting to be done, these feelings of powerlessness can build to an uncomfortable level.
  5. Ongoing stress – There are many stressors that come along with a trucking job. From government regulations, schedule changes and logbook rules to other drivers on the road who are not paying attention or seem to hate all semis. Finding ways to manage these stress levels in the cab of a truck can be difficult if not impossible.
  6. Irregular sleep schedule – New logbook regulations create an irregular schedule for most drivers on the road today. Instead of being able to stop and sleep when they feel drowsy, many are required to keep on driving in order to get the maximum number of driving hours allowed by law. Day and night are no longer taken into consideration, only the computer in the truck that tells a driver when they may and may not be driving. Unfortunately, this disruption of circadian rhythms has also been linked to depression.

Ways to Prevent Depression

Truck drivers and employers who understand and are willing to address the possibility of depression for over the road drivers can often make changes that help to prevent the dark cloud from settling in the cab of the truck in the first place.

One thing that can help drivers is a sense of community within the trucking industry, and with the benefit of the internet, finding a community can be as easy as the click of a mouse. Some companies work to keep drivers talking and connecting based on age group, experience or route similarities. Other companies have found that pairing an older driver with a younger driver, even if they drive different vehicles, can form a mutually beneficial teacher–student relationship. There are many driver forums available on the internet where drivers, in their downtime, can ask questions, tell about the hardest part of their day or just chat with someone who understands.

Having healthier eating habits can help drivers fight depression as well. Employers can help in this effort by making sure each semi has a working refrigerator and microwave, so drivers will not feel fatty truck stop food is their only option. Some employers even host incentive programs based on healthy eating options or weight loss among a group of drivers.

Exercise might be the very last thing on a driver’s mind, but getting regular exercise has been proven to be effective in fighting depression. Trucking companies should have exercise facilities available at the hub offices and should take time to train drivers on how to get exercise when they are not at the hub. Some drivers carry a bike so they can take a short ride when time allows while others keep a set of exercise bands in the truck so they can stretch and get some exercise before they go to sleep.

Realizing that depression among truckers is a very common problem is the first step in helping to find a cure. Employers and drivers who work together are sure to find a solution that benefits everyone involved.