Simple Ways Your Trucking Company Can Be More Eco-Friendly

During the course of operating your trucking company, you might have wondered if there are steps you can take to be more environmentally friendly, no matter how minor those steps might be. You’ll be pleased to know that there are actions that support eco-friendly trucking companies. Find out how you can do your part to preserve Mother Earth without going to great lengths, or great expense.

Careful Route Planning

Simply taking out time to plan your route and have any other drivers you have plan their routes go a long way in saving resources as well as money. Traffic jams, construction and poor weather conditions can all increase your traveling time and the emissions churning out into the environment.

Slow Down

Pay close attention to the posted speed limit. Slowing down just five miles makes a big difference in the emissions your trucks are putting out. Going back to the tip touched on above, by meticulously planning out your route, there’s less chance of you needing to rush to make it to your destination on time. Additionally, get into the habit of looking both far and near while driving so you can slowly start slowing down when you see a field of brake lights coming up.

Recognize Opportunities to Turn Your Truck Off

When the opportunity presents itself, turn your truck off rather than leaving it on and burning gas (as well as money). Whenever you’re at a truck stop, take advantage of electrification systems or auxiliary units so you can keep the temperature in your truck comfortable without using your own diesel (and money).

Take Good Care of Your Truck

Properly maintaining your truck and its equipment are essential to allowing it to operate at peak efficiency, saving money and doing your part to preserve the environment. Just like you would with a regular automobile, you want to keep up with fluid levels, proper tire pressure and adhere to a routine maintenance schedule as recommended by the truck manufacturer. Taking proper care of your truck is not only great for the environment, but goes a long way in avoiding breakdowns and similar issues later on down the road, which saves money, time and frustration.

No matter how great of a job you do when it comes to taking exemplary care of your truck, it’s not going to last forever. If your current truck is older than seven years, not only is it likely to have poor emissions control, it might be time to think about retiring that truck.

Upgrade Your Equipment

With the money you save on maintenance and diesel, you can look into adding aerodynamic panels to your truck. What they do is help boost your overall fuel efficiency, and you’re sure to love how they make your truck look. There are also exhaust control devices, engine upgrade kits and engine repowers, some of which make for great options for older truck models.

Don’t Forget the Office

You can take your eco-friendly practices outside your truck and inside your base of operations. Specifically, consider starting a recycling program with designated bins. Taking steps to ensure lights are turned off in rooms that aren’t in use and doing the same with computers and equipment saves money as well as electricity. Having meetings devoted to enacting new eco-friendly practices with your drivers and staff helps ensure everyone is aware of what they can do to go green.

Intelligent Logistics

While planning routes and deliveries, bear in mind where different loads are going. If two or more are headed for the same endpoint, do yourself (and the Earth) a favor and think about combining them. Doing so saves time while maximizing efficiency.

Stay Informed of Current Regulations

The Environmental Protection Agency and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration have taken steps to create regulations specific to the trucking industry in response to global warming. It’s best that you know what’s going on with both regulatory bodies so you know what to expect down the line and to better ensure you don’t fall behind on the latest requirements. Keeping your finger on the pulse of the latest requirements and developments gives you plenty of time to make all necessary changes, which is better than scurrying and playing catch-up before a deadline that’s right around the corner.

Look Into Alternative Fuels

There are alternative fuels you might want to consider if you’re concerned about the impact diesel has on the environment. Specifically, you can choose between propane, electricity, CNG and hydrogen. Do your research to see which you feel is a good fit for you, your company and your budget. Additionally, there might be special credits or write-offs you can take advantage of by switching to an alternative fuel, which can offset any investment you have to make to change fuel types.

Having a more eco-friendly trucking company doesn’t have to take a lot of time or money. Put these suggestions into action and see how they work for you and Mother Nature.

 

Tips for Starting Out As an Owner Operator

There’s nothing quite like owning your own business and being your own boss, but you have to take care to make the most of your investment of time, money and energy. The right approach and information can mean the difference between success and failure, so be sure you’re armed with new owner operator tips as you build your trucking company.

Know How You’ll Bring in Money

You likely have a loose idea of how you plan on making money as you’re sketching out your truck owner operator business plan, but you’ll be much better off solidifying that idea as much as possible. As an owner operator, there are two main ways to make money: leasing to a carrier and operating on your own by booking your own loads.

If you choose to lease to a carrier, you’ll need to get in touch with recruiters to see what will be expected of you as a driver in regards to how long you’ll be out, the pay you can expect and the type of insurance you’ll need. Be sure to talk to drivers as well to get a balanced idea of what you can expect if you choose to work with a particular carrier.

Like the idea of booking your own loads? Chat with brokers and potential customers, and check out load boards as well. Be clear on what brokers will expect from you and the type of equipment and truck you’ll need to be successful. Know that if you’re brand new to the trucking industry, you’ll have a lot of work ahead of you if you decide to book loads on your own.

Save as Much Money as Possible

Besides money coming in, you’ll also need to think about the money going out as you put your business together. If you don’t yet have a truck, save up as much as possible on a down payment or leasing your truck. Not only will your equipment payments be lower if you offer up a hefty down payment, you’re more likely to have an easier time securing financing with a sizeable down payment.

Besides money for your truck, you also have to think about operational costs. You’ll need trucking insurance and funds for out-of-pocket expenses, maintenance, food, fuel and unexpected repairs. There might also be a period where you’re unable to make runs because of a mechanical breakdown, so plan your budget accordingly.

Boost Your Credit As Much As Possible

Speaking of financing, something else you can do is increase your personal credit score as much as you can before applying for financing. Request a free credit report and look over it for any mistakes or discrepancies that need to be corrected before lenders pull your credit. Pay all bills on time, early if possible, and do your best not to use any more of your credit if you don’t absolutely have to. While you may have to put off launching your business for a little while as you increase your credit score, doing so will only benefit you later in the form of low interest payments, which means more money to funnel into the success of your business.

You might also want to look into getting a business credit card so you can make purchases specifically for your business. This is a good idea so you can keep your personal spending separate from your business spending. Just like your personal credit score, take steps to keep your business credit score as high as possible at all times.

Plan for Preventative Maintenance Before You Need It

Also be sure you think about preventative maintenance, even if you plan on purchasing a brand new truck. While you’re exploring options for which truck you think is the best fit for your business, look into how much preventative maintenance will cost. Even if that maintenance is several years away, putting money back for it now ensures you not only have a means to pay for that necessary maintenance, but that you don’t have to put that maintenance off. Just like with a regular automobile, taking care of small issues and taking steps to keep your rig as fully functional as possible helps avoid unnecessary breakdowns and the equally unnecessary expenses that come with them.

Think About Your Personal Relationships

If you have a spouse, significant other or family, think about how your relationship with them could change while you’re on the road. Issues can develop with you being away from home, so be sure you have this discussion with your loved ones about how you’ll address any problems that might come up in the future so that you don’t risk a disruption in your business or personal life.

Have a solid foundation underneath you before becoming an owner operator. The right insight paired with a little foresight is sure to serve you and your aspirations well.

The ELD Deadline Has Passed: Now What?

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration put into effect a new mandate for truck drivers regarding how they log their hours. The ELD mandate went into effect on April 1, 2018 and requires all drivers to now use an electronic logging device to track and record their hours of service. These devices are installed into the vehicles and automatically record driving times. If a driver is found to not have an ELD and not be using one to log hours of service, the driver will fail an inspection and not be able to drive.

What Happens When a Truck Is Not ELD Compliant?

The rules under the mandate indicate that on and after April 1, 2018, all drivers must use an ELD. If a driver is not using one, he or she cannot drive and must be placed out of service. They will not be required to stop driving at an inspection point, though. They can continue to their destination, but cannot drive after that. The driver cannot drive again until after a ten hour period even if he or she becomes compliant within that time. Drivers may face fines if they are not compliant with the law.

How To Ensure Compliance

Drivers and carriers must take ELD requirements seriously to avoid penalties. To ensure compliance, drivers need to choose a device from the list of FMCSA-approved ELDs. It is also important for drivers to remember that not all electronic recording devices are created equal, and therefore, not all are approved. The devices that will comply with FMCSA regulations all draw information from the engine automatically. Also, as part of the mandate, a driver must have with him or her in the truck the user manual, ELD malfunction sheet and data transfer instructions.

Once they have a device, truck drivers need to learn how to use it. Having it is not enough to be completely compliant. It is important that a driver knows how to transfer the information on the ELD because this must be done during inspections. In addition, every driver must know how to log out.

Dealing With Common Issues

Since ELDs are being used to monitor service hours and ensure drivers are staying within the limits and operating legally, it is imperative to ensure the information on the device is accurate. However, there have already been some common issues that are causing problems for truck drivers.

As with any electronic device, an ELD can malfunction. This was taken into consideration when the law was implemented. If their devices malfunction, drivers are allowed to use a paper log system for up to eight days while the ELD is repaired. The eight day period can be extended but a request must be made. Extensions are typically granted if the device is not accurately recording hours due to an internal issue, but decisions are made on a case-by-case basis.

ELDs have an edit feature that every truck driver needs to know how to use. Edits may be required in many different situations to fix issues with recorded hours that were not actually drive hours. Only a driver should edit information in the ELD because the driver is the one ultimately responsible for the information. Edits made by others have to be approved through the system before they are recorded. If a driver does not okay an edit, it will not be recorded.

The device keeps a record of both edited and unedited versions of the logs, so any mistakes can be fixed and edits cannot be used to get around the hours of service laws.

Another common issue is hours when the driver is not the one behind the wheel yet they are recorded as drive hours. The best way to avoid this issue is to assign a maintenance log in for anyone else who will drive the truck. For example, if the truck requires maintenance, then whenever the truck is driven by maintenance personnel, they need to use the maintenance log in. That way, the hours are going under something and not being left for the driver to have to worry about.

While the new ELD rule can be great for many reasons, such as reducing paperwork, some may find it frustrating. However, being compliant with the FMCSA’s ELD requirements is mandatory. Drivers are the ones who ultimately hold the responsibility to ensure compliance. They need to be aware of the rules and know how to use the device properly or they could face penalties.