In 2019, Independent Truck Drivers Are Earning More Than Company Drivers

Striking out on your own and working in the gig economy may seem like a risky endeavor for people working in tech or the arts. But one area where being self-employed is actually coming out ahead is in the trucking business. Self-employed truck drivers, also known as owner-operators, earn more per hour and work longer, or have more business opportunities, than company drivers.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, in a May 2018 report, the average truck driver salary hovers around $43,680 a year. The average salary for owner-operators, which make up about 11 percent of the trucking industry, comes in about 5 percent higher. Plus, in the spirit of making their own schedule, these drivers can take on more work as they please.

Let’s take a better look at what’s impacting this trend.

Trending Up

Among workers across all jobs in the industry, self-employment has been heading lower on a steady basis, even with increasing numbers during economic downturns when workers who are laid off turn to self-employment. Considering other factors such as age, education, sex, and family status, self-employed truck drivers earn about five percent more per hour compared to company drivers, bringing their average salary up to about $45,500 annually.

But factoring in more availability to take on more work and you have more earning potential and a more attractive opportunity for drivers to go out on their own. The income and hours advantage among the self-employed does not necessarily hold up in other industries that employ large numbers of employees with the same kind of demographic profile. Think mining, food service, construction.

Not Guaranteed

This advantage for self-employed drivers may not be a uniform opportunity for all in the industry. While it may be attractive to work for yourself, make your own schedule, and earn more money, getting additional jobs and a steady stream of work may not be a guarantee.

The best owner-operators have the potential to earn more money per hour, but some actually end up taking a loss compared to company drivers. The top group of owner-operators earns 52 percent more per hour than their company driver counterparts, which comes out to about $19,000 more. But the bottom level of drivers actually earns as little as 30 percent less than regular drivers.

What’s more, you have to be willing to work longer hours if you want to be self-employed on the road. On average, owner-operators put in an extra hour a week behind the wheel. It may not seem like much, but it’s the pace that drivers have to keep up with in order to earn more that may grind away at them after a while.

Also, there are risks built in when it comes to working as an owner-operator. Self-employed drivers are more exposed to variables in the trucking industry that could affect their opportunities and wages, plus they have to pay their own commercial truck insurance and take care of their own maintenance fees. If a mechanical issue arises, commercial truck insurance won’t be able to protect an owner-operator. But even with these risks, there are owner-operators willing to go it alone and boost their own opportunities. Being a self-employed driver can be a lucrative endeavor that also provides an enviable level of autonomy that others want.

About Western Truck Insurance Services

Western Truck Insurance Services is a commercial truck insurance agency with roots dating back to 1954. We have evolved into a highly respected, professionally managed, truck and transportation insurance brokerage. The hallmark of our organization is our desire to provide unparalleled service. We go way beyond what you expect to receive from an insurance brokerage. Equipped with state of the art automation, Western Truck Insurance can provide you with lightning fast truck insurance quotes, customer service, Insurance certificates, and coverage changes.

Driver-Facing Cameras in Trucking Operations: Yea or Nay?

The commercial trucking industry is in the middle of a major overhaul right now. From a massive labor shortage to the electric and autonomous truck markets developing at a fast pace, trucking isn’t the same as it has traditionally been, and is expected to continue in this way in the coming years.

One trend that is kicking up some controversy is the installation around installing driver-facing cameras in truck cabins. This issue has created issues around privacy and accountability and has even opened up new stipulations around commercial truck insurance.

Front-facing cameras, recording what’s going on surrounding the truck, have been used for years now, which has helped with security and legal issues, such as proving fault in something like an accident involving a commercial truck. But does this technology cross the line? How effective can it be?

Drivers as Assets

Technology is painting a picture of a driverless future as companies like TuSimple and Uber are already officially running their autonomous trucks on highways for long-haul projects. But until this becomes a full-scale reality, drivers are still the number one asset for the industry, especially for short-range projects, which will still see truckers in the driver’s seat even with self-driving trucks on the road.

And while truckers are valued in the industry and play a pivotal role in the entire freight industry when it comes to preventing a backlog, telling them cameras will be watching them may not be well-received. In an article from American Trucker, the consensus from those doing the driving aren’t on board for this addition to their operations. And with a shortage of 180,000 drivers expected by 2024, the industry can’t afford to lose any more favor.

Short-Term Effects

Installing driver-facing cameras that monitor drivers with the goals of monitoring performance and raising accountability may have short-term effects, such as causing them to drive more carefully or reducing their speed. But over time, drivers may forget the cameras are there or simply turn a blind eye, so to speak, when it comes to having their every move being watched.

On the other hand, for trucking operations, driver-facing cameras can be beneficial for a number of reasons. These recordings can be used as coaching tools to help with onboarding and adjusting performance expectations. And when it comes to accidents, driver-facing cameras can also help with proving fault or innocence when related to commercial truck insurance claims in incidents.

Other Considerations

Trucking companies can begin looking for feedback from driver recruiters and safety managers to highlight the pros and cons of having this kind of surveillance installed. Will it make the job easier or more stressful? What’re the long-term effects of how these cameras can help with performance?

Finally, the drivers themselves should also be considered in decision-making since it will be their jobs and reputations on the line. Surveyed drivers in the recruiting process can be asked if they would consider not taking a job if it included working under the watchful eye of a camera. Bottom line, discussions should continue and opinions should be expressed during planning and execution of this kind of change to the industry.

About Western Truck Insurance Services

Western Truck Insurance Services is a commercial truck insurance agency with roots dating back to 1954. We have evolved into a highly respected, professionally managed, truck and transportation insurance brokerage. The hallmark of our organization is our desire to provide unparalleled service. We go way beyond what you expect to receive from an insurance brokerage. Equipped with state of the art automation, Western Truck Insurance can provide you with lightning fast truck insurance quotes, customer service, Insurance certificates, and coverage changes.

FMCSA Establishes Drug and Alcohol Clearinghouse for Commercial Drivers

The Federal Motor Carrier Administration (FMCSA) has recently announced it will be establishing the Commercial Driver’s License (CDL) Drug and Alcohol Clearinghouse, a new database that will include information related to violations of the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) and its controlled substances and alcohol testing program.

Currently, the Clearinghouse rule requires FMCSA-regulated employers, Medical Review Officers (MROs), Substance Abuse Professionals (SAPs), consortia/third-party administrators (C/TPA), and other service agents to report to the Clearinghouse information that’s notable in violations of the drug and alcohol regulations. These are specific to regulations in 49 Code of Federal Regulations, parts 40 and 382 by prospective employees as well as current employees.

What’s Required and What’s Expected

The main issue with the Clearinghouse is that it’s trying to help trucking companies be prevented from hiring employees who have been prohibited in the past or are currently prohibited from operating a commercial vehicle based on DOT drug and alcohol program violations. If trucking companies violate these terms and regulations it can spell trouble for them legally and in business.

That’s why having a commercial truck insurance plan in place to protect against liabilities, such as hiring employees with checkered pasts, is vital to keep operations running smoothly and above board.

Pre-Employment Checks

Companies will have to check in with the Clearinghouse for all new hires to see if they have any drug and alcohol violations that keep them from performing safety-sensitive functions. This means that the driver in question must be registered with the Clearinghouse as well.

The Clearinghouse will make sure to provide FMCSA and employers the important tools to identify drivers who are prohibited from operating these vehicles, so as to avoid this kind of issue. Having a prohibited driver hired on can create not only conflicts from a regulatory standpoint but can also create a number of risks for the road, putting the safety and overall well-being of others out there in the driver’s hands.

The Clearinghouse will also help to ensure that drivers receive the required evaluation and treatment before operating a CMV on public roads. More specifically, information maintained in the Clearinghouse will enable employers in the trucking industry to spot drivers who commit a drug or alcohol program violation while working for one employer, but who fail to inform another employer (such as a contractor would).

Records related to any drug and alcohol program violations will be kept in the Clearinghouse for five years, or until the driver in question has completed the return-to-duty process.

About Western Truck Insurance Services

Western Truck Insurance Services is a commercial truck insurance agency with roots dating back to 1954. We have evolved into a highly respected, professionally managed, truck and transportation insurance brokerage. The hallmark of our organization is our desire to provide unparalleled service. We go way beyond what you expect to receive from an insurance brokerage. Equipped with state of the art automation, Western Truck Insurance can provide you with lightning fast truck insurance quotes, customer service, Insurance certificates, and coverage changes.

How Truck Drivers Can Stay Protected from the Sun

Being a truck driver presents a number of risks while traveling from highway to highway. Car wrecks, loss or damage to freight, engine trouble and more are just some of the ways in which a day behind the wheel can take a turn for the worse. But one risk that isn’t discussed as thoroughly is damage to a truck driver’s skin after years on the open road.

Truck drivers literally face irreparable damage, including skin cancer, every day they get behind the wheel and head out for long hauls. Trucking companies should keep information available for their drivers and avoid liability risks related to claims of skin cancer or eye issues. Having commercial truck insurance can help protect trucking companies, but keeping drivers protected first should be the goal. It’s important to sport the signs of sun damage and make moves on limiting risk over time.

Here are some ideas on how to stay protected from the sun.

Know the Signs of Sun Damage

First, it’s important to be aware of sun damage and look out for its effects early on. Even minimal sun exposure to one side of your face can cause skin cancer to develop and cause more harm over the years. Drivers should be looking out for spider veins, skin spots, and freckles that are out of the ordinary, and check on skin texture too.

Too much sunlight causes the collagen in your skin to break down, which prevents your skin from creating new collagen to repair itself over time. Even if the side effects of sun exposure are discovered, it may be too late to take action.

Use Sunscreen Every Day

Step number one is making sure to lather up on good quality sunscreen every single day, no questions asked. It’s a simple step that drivers can do right before they take off for the day. Your windows may be able to filter out the sun’s UVB rays, but they won’t do anything to stop the more harmful UVA rays from coming in. This is why we suggest a broad-spectrum sunscreen because it offers up protection for the skin from both types of solar radiation. Start out with an SPF 30 then move up from there if need be.

Avoid Peak Hours

Between 10am and 2pm, the sun’s rays are at their strongest. While driving can’t be avoided during those hours every day, it is important to take extra care of your skin. Try to take walks and breaks during the morning and evening hours to avoid sunlight, but still remember to put on sunscreen and stay in the shade as much as possible.

Change Your Clothes

While this is a good rule of thumb anyway, changing up what you wear can be helpful in keeping sunlight away from you and damaging your skin further. A simple way to protect yourself from the sun’s harmful effects is to wear clothes that shield your skin. During the summer, try to wear long-sleeved shirts, long pants, and hats that cover face and neck.

Wear Some Shades

Eye care is just as important as skin care when it comes to sun damage. Don’t overlook eye care when it comes to this part of the job as you need to be able to see well when you’re taking care of your operations. Invest in some high-quality sunglasses that polarize the sunlight coming through and filter out the bad rays. This will help to keep visibility high while maintaining safety from the sun.

About Western Truck Insurance Services

Western Truck Insurance Services is a commercial truck insurance agency with roots dating back to 1954. We have evolved into a highly respected, professionally managed, truck and transportation insurance brokerage. The hallmark of our organization is our desire to provide unparalleled service. We go way beyond what you expect to receive from an insurance brokerage. Equipped with state of the art automation, Western Truck Insurance can provide you with lightning fast truck insurance quotes, customer service, Insurance certificates, and coverage changes.

The Biggest Reasons Why Truck Drivers Quit

The trucking industry is in the middle of big upheaval. With the advent of sophisticated technology, such as autonomous trucks and a focus on data, truck drivers are finding their roles changing at a rapid rate. In fact, the industry is already in the middle of huge changes in the turnover of trucking professionals creating the need to fill vacant and soon-to-be vacant roles.

As the older generation of truck drivers begin to retire the American Trucking Association puts the number of truck drivers needed in the next few years between 60,000 upwards of 100,000. But even without the phasing out of one generation and the boost in tech-driven trucks, the industry still sees a great deal of its drivers quit due to a number of avoidable reasons.

Here are some reasons why truck drivers tend to call it quits.

Money Issues

Pay is always a huge problem in the trucking industry. Drivers can see crazy schedules keeping them up long hours and away from home for days or even weeks at a time depending on their routes. One thing that makes this kind of life worth it is a decent wage, but some drivers find that that may not be enough. A driver can never fully tell what they’ll make week-to-week, which only adds more stress to an already stressful job.

More Time at Home

Piggybacking off the previous notes, drivers can end up being away from their loved ones for longer than they want to. While being away for a certain amount of time is in the job description, it can take a toll on a driver’s home life and road life. Trucking companies can help by accommodating home life schedules or time off requests that allow for more agreeable time off.

Lack of Insurance for Drivers

Commercial truck insurance plays a role on both sides of the coin; for both the trucker and the company they work for. Having the proper commercial truck insurance can provide the financial protection a company needs when an incident occurs on the road or a when a claim is made by a professional driver. When a company doesn’t invest properly in commercial truck insurance it may signal the driver that management is not looking out for the well-being of everyone in the operation.

Appreciation

Many drivers walk away from their job because they feel let down by management, and not appreciated enough for the grueling job they do every day. Drivers want to know what’s expected of them, to see growth in the company they work for, and how it affects their future. To address this issue, companies and leaders need to deliver on their promises and commitments. Communication is huge and should be a major component of the daily operations side of a trucking company to keep transparency and support open and fluid.

About Western Truck Insurance Services

Western Truck Insurance Services is a commercial truck insurance agency with roots dating back to 1954. We have evolved into a highly respected, professionally managed, truck and transportation insurance brokerage. The hallmark of our organization is our desire to provide unparalleled service. We go way beyond what you expect to receive from an insurance brokerage. Equipped with state of the art automation, Western Truck Insurance can provide you with lightning fast truck insurance quotes, customer service, Insurance certificates and coverage changes.

Why It’s Important for Truck Drivers to Have Roadside Assistance Coverage

One of the worst situations a trucking professional can be in is being stranded on the side of the road without help coming their way. It’s even worse when a tire fails or an engine burns out while hauling across the country and having to pull over in the middle of nowhere.

Trucking companies and their drivers need to know the risk of operating without specialized commercial truck insurance programs, such as roadside assistance. Having a 24-hour roadside assistance plan covering your vehicles while they’re on the road will add peace of mind and a comprehensive solution to keeping everything safe. From towing to flat tires, mobile mechanic service to a simple jump start, commercial truck roadside assistance is a must-have for trucking companies.

No one can predict when something will go awry while behind the wheel. If you find yourself stuck on the side of the road with no help coming there’s probably a lot to consider. Will you get to your pickup spot on time? Will you be able to drop off in time? What about the cargo you’re hauling—is it something that needs to be kept at a certain temperature?

There are so many factors to consider when it comes to having roadside assistance. Even just being stranded can be a taxing on a truck driver as it keeps them away from home as well as putting their job in possible jeopardy.

What Our Roadside Assistance Can Do For Your Operation

Western Truck Insurance offers commercial truck insurance with roadside assistance services that can help to answer the call when something doesn’t go according to plan. This is a great and inexpensive service that won’t be taxing on your company’s budget and will help to keep everything moving without having to worry about forking over too much. Here are some of the benefits you get with roadside assistance:

  • Unlimited Roadside Assistance
  • Towing – up to 50 miles per disablement
  • Flat Tire Assistance
  • Tire Replacement Assistance – up to $100 per disablement
  • Mobile Mechanic Service
  • Vehicle Winching / Extricating
  • Custom Trip Routing / Navigation Assistance
  • Vehicle Jump start
  • Hotel and Travel Discounts
  • Oil, Fluid and Water Delivery Service
  • Lockout / Replacement Key Services – up to $100
  • Fuel Delivery Service – up to 30 gallons of fuel
  • Concierge Service – restaurants, lodging, truck stops, fuel stops, etc.
  • Road America’s Savings Connection Program – save on prescriptions, car rentals, theme parks and more

About Western Truck Insurance Services

Western Truck Insurance Services is a commercial truck insurance agency with roots dating back to 1954. We have evolved into a highly respected, professionally managed, truck and transportation insurance brokerage. The hallmark of our organization is our desire to provide unparalleled service. We go way beyond what you expect to receive from an insurance brokerage. Equipped with state of the art automation, Western Truck Insurance can provide you with lightning fast truck insurance quotes, customer service, Insurance certificates and coverage changes.

Will California Require Truck Drivers to Take Unpaid Rest Breaks?

In December of 2018, a ruling from the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) stated that California trucking companies, while still requiring their employees to take rest breaks, are exempt from providing truck drivers paid rest. The ruling has been controversial to say the least and has already been set up to be challenged in court. Teamsters have already sued over the decision and petitions have been signed to reverse the ruling.

According to the FMCSA, there have been more crashes involving trucks in the northern California area, heading into Oregon. This has been due, in part, to a decline in parking. If a trucking professional can’t park and take a break, they simply keep on driving. This is a reason why it’s important for commercial truck insurance to be in place to protect drivers, their trucks and their companies.

The FMCSA holds the position that paid rest breaks reduce productivity, so not paying for them will motivate drivers to be more efficient in their work. Teamsters unions, on the other hand, are arguing that federal laws can’t overrule California’s state labor laws. Another argument from teamsters is that not having breaks covered will actually motivate drivers to forgo taking the right amount of rest while they are behind the wheel, causing them to decline in health, focus and safety.

Currently, the American Trucking Association has stated that it wants to do away with rest breaks altogether, promoting the idea that rest breaks would be bad for corporations. But attorneys for those who are suing say that the ATA’s arguments related to loss of productivity are not really supported.

In California, state labor laws stipulate specify that workers should get a 30-minute meal break for shifts longer than five hours and also that transportation workers rest for 10 minutes every four hours. The U.S. Court of Appeal for the Ninth Circuit in California ruled that carriers in the state must make sure that truck drivers get the right amount of rest and meal breaks.

The ATA has appealed to Congress before when it comes to these rulings, pleading over and over that rest breaks are bad for business. They’ve even gone as far as looking for support from the Trump Administration. The only question now is how will this all play out in court? Will it be a long, drawn-out fight?


About Western Truck Insurance Services

Western Truck Insurance Services is a commercial truck insurance agency with roots dating back to 1954. We have evolved into a highly respected, professionally managed, truck and transportation insurance brokerage. The hallmark of our organization is our desire to provide unparalleled service. We go way beyond what you expect to receive from an insurance brokerage. Equipped with state of the art automation, Western Truck Insurance can provide you with lightning fast truck insurance quotes, customer service, Insurance certificates and coverage changes.

What Additional Coverages Do Couriers Need?

On-demandfood and package delivery has seen a huge rise in engagement in the last couple of years, with options like AmazonPrime, Uber Eats and GrubHub taking over space on the phones of consumers.While this is great for people who want their orders delivered on time, this iscausing those companies to find new employees to meet the high and growingdemand.

This growing market is also bringing to light another major issue: liabilities. And this isn’t just for food delivery or small packages—it’s also for independent contractors who haul mid-sized to large orders. Who’s at risk and for what, and what can be covered? These are some questions that independent couriers have to ask and find answers for taking on new work.

Different Types of Insurance

Courierbusinesses who use five or fewer vehicles will need to take on courierinsurance. This is similar to truck insurance for trucking operations, but with a very specific bend. For largeroperations more than five vehicles, there can be an option for something calledvan and fleet insurance. And independent couriers who drive freight trucks canlook into specific protection under truck insurance policies as notes above.

Some courierinsurance policies can be combined with additional extra protections such asbreakdown and accident recovery and protected no-claims discounts. Couriersshould take time to think about what exactly they need covered and what sortsof premiums and excess they would be willing to pay for. For courier fleetinsurance, courier businesses can find protection that allows the owners tochange the vehicles they cover through time.

Independentcouriers operate in a wide range of areas with differing circumstances, so it’simportant to find a tailor-fit protection plan that will cover all your uniqueneeds.

What Exactly Does Courier InsuranceCover?

Like truckinsurance, courier insurance can offer a wide range of protection for couriers.A basic courier insurance policy covers damage to goods being delivered, lossof goods being delivered, and damage to a vehicle in the event that an accidenthappens during delivery, which can always happen.

Courierinsurance is frequently sold as a package with coverage that apply to yourbusiness operations. It’s important to know what is covered and what needs tobe supplemented in order to receive the best, full-scale coverage so you arefinancially protected in the event of a loss.

Morespecifically, there are a few levels of courier insurance that include:

  • Third-party only (TPO): A basic type of insurance coverage as required by the law. Third partyonly (PTO) covers third-party liabilities in case an accident happens.
  • Third party fire & theft (TPFT): This is a middle of the road-type insurance that covers liabilities aswell as fire and theft that could happen on vehicles.
  • Comprehensive courier insurance: This kind of insurance covers all basic elements, fire, theft as well asthe vehicles in question.

About Western Truck Insurance Services

Western Truck Insurance Services is a commercial truck insurance agency with roots dating back to 1954. We have evolved into a highly respected, professionally managed, truck and transportation insurance brokerage. The hallmark of our organization is our desire to provide unparalleled service. We go way beyond what you expect to receive from an insurance brokerage. Equipped with state of the art automation, Western Truck Insurance can provide you with lightning fast truck insurance quotes, customer service, Insurance certificates and coverage changes.

The Key Differences Between General Liability Insurance and Truck Liability Insurance Coverage

General liability insurance and specialized commercial truck insurance may sound like they are one and the same, or interchangeable, but there are some key differences that can be addressed to clear up confusion. The main thing to know is that a general liability policy  is not be enough to cover a trucking operation that wants to protect their company from costly bills and reputational damage.

To better understand the right option for your trucking operation, let’s go over a few key comparisons that can help you make the right coverage decision depending on your needs.

Overview

For general liability insurance, the name itself should be an indicator as to its coverage and extent. This kind of coverage pertains to very broad third-party liability coverage not related to automobiles or trucks. Protection for injuries or property damage, such as injuries sustained while on company premises, are the types of things this kind of coverage is made for.

Truck (auto) liability insurance is meant to zero-in on the use of, and third party liability for, trucks and their operations. This kind of protection is a requirement and is usually the costliest type of insurance.Truck liability insurance protects for property damage or injuries to other people as a result of truck accidents and is required by State and Federal agencies.

Policy Limits

For Commercial General Liability insurance, policy limits are usually issued at $1,000,000 per any one occurrence and $2,000,000 in aggregate for the policy for one year. Of course, higher limits can be set depending on your operation and needs.

Truck liability insurance is generally issued at limits of $750,000 per any one occurrence which is the limit set by US DoT for trucks having a GVW over 10,000 lbs. Most trucking companies are carrying $1,000,000 limits of coverage and the recent trend is to get higher limits. For those vehicles under 10,000 GVW, or not subject to Federal DOT requirements, lower limits may be obtained. Your insurance broker can verify the requirements you are subject to.

Additional Considerations

When it comes to truck liability insurance, various policy endorsements are available. Some additional coverage to keep in mind include pollution liability, Federal MCS90 and State form endorsements that extend coverage to regulatory agencies.

Additional broader forms are available where  the policy can be issued on an “any auto,” basis, or issued with Hired and/or Non-Owned Autos which further protects the trucking company from other liability they may have on vehicles they do not own.

Regardless of all the moving parts that need to be taken into consideration, consulting with your commercial truck insurance representative is always a good rule of thumb to follow to get accurate pricing and coverage options.

About Western Truck Insurance Services

Western Truck Insurance Services is a commercial truck insurance agency with roots dating back to 1954. We have evolved into a highly respected, professionally managed, truck and transportation insurance brokerage. The hallmark of our organization is our desire to provide unparalleled service. We go way beyond what you expect to receive from an insurance brokerage. Equipped with state of the art automation, Western Truck Insurance can provide you with lightning fast truck insurance quotes, customer service, Insurance certificates and coverage changes.

What Owner-Operators Need to Know About Truck Insurance

The road to becoming an owner-operator of your own semi-truck, heading up your own fleet operations, can be long and arduous. Years of driving for someone else’s fleet and dealing with long hauls and unfavorable scheduling have finally paid off and it’s time to be your own boss. But while you may be excited to choose your own routes and raise your asking price for jobs, there’s still the matter of commercial truck insurance to handle.

It is a sure thing that all drivers have had their own association with commercial truck insuranceto some capacity in their careers. But when it comes time to manage your own operations, commercial truck insurance becomes even more imperative. What you have to keep in mind are variables like your role and responsibility towards freight brokers, motor carriers, shippers and clients. From choosing to lease with a larger company to dealing with safety concerns on the road, choosing the right program is needed when you step into the shoes of an owner-operator.

Liability Insurance

It’s good start with liability insurance coverage that protects you in the event of an accident. Even if your record behind the wheel is clean, it’s always important to have the right insurance coverage to provide the right financial support.  This is usually the most costly part of the owner operator insurance program.

About 4,000 people die in large truck/semi-truck crashes per year, not to mention many more who are injured due to other incidents involving fleet vehicles. When something like this occurs, it pays to have the right commercial truck insurance in your corner.

Physical Damage Insurance

Owner-operators should also look into physical damage insurance, which covers the current  value of your truck.. Gap insurance can also be purchased, much like automobile insurance, to help cover for the different between the value of a truck and any loan balance in the event the vehicle is totaled.

Cargo Insurance

Cargo insurance is also noted as a must insurance coverage. .  Truckers generally need to carry 100,000 in coverage, but current trends have this limit increasing especially considering  the type and value of the freight being hauled. Trucking professionals can also inquire about adding on load-specific motor truck cargo  insurance if they contract for a certain type of cargo.

Other Types of Commercial Truck Insurance

Owner-operators often haul someone else’s trailer. This can be covered by something called non-owned  trailer insurance. This kind of coverage protects the driver for damage to a trailer not owned. Owner-operators can also look at other coverages available meant to provide a full spectrum of support. From non-trucking liability, to General Liability,  Umbrella, and workers’ compensation, owner-operators have a full list of insurance options to stay protected.

About Western Truck Insurance Services

Western Truck Insurance Services is a commercial truck insurance agency with roots dating back to 1954. We have evolved into a highly respected, professionally managed, truck and transportation insurance brokerage. The hallmark of our organization is our desire to provide unparalleled service. We go way beyond what you expect to receive from an insurance brokerage. Equipped with state of the art automation, Western Truck Insurance can provide you with lightning fast truck insurance quotes, customer service, Insurance certificates and coverage changes.