In 2019, Independent Truck Drivers Are Earning More Than Company Drivers

Striking out on your own and working in the gig economy may seem like a risky endeavor for people working in tech or the arts. But one area where being self-employed is actually coming out ahead is in the trucking business. Self-employed truck drivers, also known as owner-operators, earn more per hour and work longer, or have more business opportunities, than company drivers.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, in a May 2018 report, the average truck driver salary hovers around $43,680 a year. The average salary for owner-operators, which make up about 11 percent of the trucking industry, comes in about 5 percent higher. Plus, in the spirit of making their own schedule, these drivers can take on more work as they please.

Let’s take a better look at what’s impacting this trend.

Trending Up

Among workers across all jobs in the industry, self-employment has been heading lower on a steady basis, even with increasing numbers during economic downturns when workers who are laid off turn to self-employment. Considering other factors such as age, education, sex, and family status, self-employed truck drivers earn about five percent more per hour compared to company drivers, bringing their average salary up to about $45,500 annually.

But factoring in more availability to take on more work and you have more earning potential and a more attractive opportunity for drivers to go out on their own. The income and hours advantage among the self-employed does not necessarily hold up in other industries that employ large numbers of employees with the same kind of demographic profile. Think mining, food service, construction.

Not Guaranteed

This advantage for self-employed drivers may not be a uniform opportunity for all in the industry. While it may be attractive to work for yourself, make your own schedule, and earn more money, getting additional jobs and a steady stream of work may not be a guarantee.

The best owner-operators have the potential to earn more money per hour, but some actually end up taking a loss compared to company drivers. The top group of owner-operators earns 52 percent more per hour than their company driver counterparts, which comes out to about $19,000 more. But the bottom level of drivers actually earns as little as 30 percent less than regular drivers.

What’s more, you have to be willing to work longer hours if you want to be self-employed on the road. On average, owner-operators put in an extra hour a week behind the wheel. It may not seem like much, but it’s the pace that drivers have to keep up with in order to earn more that may grind away at them after a while.

Also, there are risks built in when it comes to working as an owner-operator. Self-employed drivers are more exposed to variables in the trucking industry that could affect their opportunities and wages, plus they have to pay their own commercial truck insurance and take care of their own maintenance fees. If a mechanical issue arises, commercial truck insurance won’t be able to protect an owner-operator. But even with these risks, there are owner-operators willing to go it alone and boost their own opportunities. Being a self-employed driver can be a lucrative endeavor that also provides an enviable level of autonomy that others want.

About Western Truck Insurance Services

Western Truck Insurance Services is a commercial truck insurance agency with roots dating back to 1954. We have evolved into a highly respected, professionally managed, truck and transportation insurance brokerage. The hallmark of our organization is our desire to provide unparalleled service. We go way beyond what you expect to receive from an insurance brokerage. Equipped with state of the art automation, Western Truck Insurance can provide you with lightning fast truck insurance quotes, customer service, Insurance certificates, and coverage changes.

In the Trucking Insurance Market, High Liability Rates Are Increasingly Common

Liability coverage makes up a big part of an independent insurance cost. This pays out injuries and property damage after a wreck. When it comes to over-the-road drivers or long-haul truck drivers, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) requires that a $750,000 minimum limit be met for the primary auto liability coverage. However, most shippers and brokers in the industry won’t set up a business relationship with trucking companies that carry anything less than $1 in truck insurance liability.

Rising Costs

Liability coverage costs have gone up year over year and don’t seem to be slowing down. Premiums for a $1 million liability policy can now range between $6,000 and $16,000 depending on the carrier and influencing factors. These high liability rates are becoming more and more common in the trucking industry, making it hard for trucking companies to factor in their budget.

So, what caused this boost in pricing?

According to our President, Bob Holtzman, it can be taken back to the 2008 recession.

Holtzman recently told Overdriveonline.com that the “marketplace was competing for what business was still there, and rates got really low.”

As the economy made a rebound, insurers were slow to react and started seeing losses take their hold well in excess of premiums. In the last few years, truck insurers increased their rates and today’s rates are much higher than the low rates seen around 2011. These rates are expected to hover around those numbers mentioned above for the next few years.

The economy has picked up in recent years, during the end of the Obama administration and into the Trump years, resulting in plenty of jobs and higher wages becoming the norm. Also, there have been more motorists on the road, as well as, more freight, especially with the influence of e-commerce freight.

These factors and others, such as the type of freight, age of equipment, typical length of haul, and states that see freight driving through, all play a role in greater claims frequency which corresponds to increasing liability rates.

In the past few years, as independent contractors have seen an increase in contracts, applications for new operating authority has increased as well. With this in mind, obtaining liability coverage has become a major challenge for those new ventures looking to make a step forward. But since the market has tightened, many truck insurance companies have instituted stricter requirements when it comes to operating experience.

About Western Truck Insurance Services

Western Truck Insurance Services is a commercial truck insurance agency with roots dating back to 1954. We have evolved into a highly respected, professionally managed, truck and transportation insurance brokerage. The hallmark of our organization is our desire to provide unparalleled service. We go way beyond what you expect to receive from an insurance brokerage. Equipped with state of the art automation, Western Truck Insurance can provide you with lightning fast truck insurance quotes, customer service, Insurance certificates, and coverage changes.

AB 5 Passes California State Senate Hearing – What Does this Mean?

In California, the trucking industry is in the middle of a legislative upheaval over certain exemptions and tests for truck drivers on the state’s highways. Legislation that could disrupt the owner-operator trucking model in California is headed to Governor Gavin Newsom’s desk to be signed.

Assembly Bill 5 (AB5) passed the state senate’s Standing Committee on Labor, Public Employment and Retirement by a 4 to 1 vote, opening to door to codify the ABC test for employee status prescribed in the 2018 Dynamex decision.

Supporting the legislation would help to seek to protect workers from employers that attempt to classify them as independent contractors instead of employees. It could also affect the price of ride-sharing apps like Uber and Lyft, which will likely create higher prices for consumers.

What the Bill Is

Under the bill, many workers who are currently under the label of independent contractor would be considered employees. This would make them subject to the state labor laws in California. What’s more, employers would have to pay payroll taxes, provide benefits, overtime, minimum wage, workers’ compensation and, in many cases, also provide the commercial truck insurance.

Opposing the Bill

The bill in its current form would hurt the owner-operators who want to stay independent. The test, which designates employee status in the legislation, provides no leeway for independent truck drivers who work with other trucking companies; including truck brokers. Trucking associations, such as the Western States Trucking Association (WSTA) have come out against the bill. They warn that the liabilities that come from it would hit employers as a result of reclassification and would ultimately lead to many, if not most, refusing to work with owner-operators.

What Happens Now?

Now, the future of the legislation is still a bit hazy. AB5 needs to be taken up by the state Senate’s Appropriations Committee, which won’t happen until later this month after the legislature’s recess is up. From there, the bill would go to the Senate floor for a major vote. If successful there, it then passes on to the Assembly chamber for a concurrence vote.

In the end, if it hurdles over those steps, the bill would then head to Gov. Newsom for signing, although Newsom does have the power to veto. Another hitch is that the bill needs to be passed by September 13 when it would die if not written into law.

Make sure to check back for future updates on this legislation.

About Western Truck Insurance Services

Western Truck Insurance Servicesis a commercial truck insurance agency with roots dating back to 1954. We have evolved into a highly respected, professionally managed, truck and transportation insurance brokerage. The hallmark of our organization is our desire to provide unparalleled service. We go way beyond what you expect to receive from an insurance brokerage. Equipped with state of the art automation, Western Truck Insurance can provide you with lightning fast truck insurance quotes, customer service, Insurance certificates, and coverage changes.

Driver-Facing Cameras in Trucking Operations: Yea or Nay?

The commercial trucking industry is in the middle of a major overhaul right now. From a massive labor shortage to the electric and autonomous truck markets developing at a fast pace, trucking isn’t the same as it has traditionally been, and is expected to continue in this way in the coming years.

One trend that is kicking up some controversy is the installation around installing driver-facing cameras in truck cabins. This issue has created issues around privacy and accountability and has even opened up new stipulations around commercial truck insurance.

Front-facing cameras, recording what’s going on surrounding the truck, have been used for years now, which has helped with security and legal issues, such as proving fault in something like an accident involving a commercial truck. But does this technology cross the line? How effective can it be?

Drivers as Assets

Technology is painting a picture of a driverless future as companies like TuSimple and Uber are already officially running their autonomous trucks on highways for long-haul projects. But until this becomes a full-scale reality, drivers are still the number one asset for the industry, especially for short-range projects, which will still see truckers in the driver’s seat even with self-driving trucks on the road.

And while truckers are valued in the industry and play a pivotal role in the entire freight industry when it comes to preventing a backlog, telling them cameras will be watching them may not be well-received. In an article from American Trucker, the consensus from those doing the driving aren’t on board for this addition to their operations. And with a shortage of 180,000 drivers expected by 2024, the industry can’t afford to lose any more favor.

Short-Term Effects

Installing driver-facing cameras that monitor drivers with the goals of monitoring performance and raising accountability may have short-term effects, such as causing them to drive more carefully or reducing their speed. But over time, drivers may forget the cameras are there or simply turn a blind eye, so to speak, when it comes to having their every move being watched.

On the other hand, for trucking operations, driver-facing cameras can be beneficial for a number of reasons. These recordings can be used as coaching tools to help with onboarding and adjusting performance expectations. And when it comes to accidents, driver-facing cameras can also help with proving fault or innocence when related to commercial truck insurance claims in incidents.

Other Considerations

Trucking companies can begin looking for feedback from driver recruiters and safety managers to highlight the pros and cons of having this kind of surveillance installed. Will it make the job easier or more stressful? What’re the long-term effects of how these cameras can help with performance?

Finally, the drivers themselves should also be considered in decision-making since it will be their jobs and reputations on the line. Surveyed drivers in the recruiting process can be asked if they would consider not taking a job if it included working under the watchful eye of a camera. Bottom line, discussions should continue and opinions should be expressed during planning and execution of this kind of change to the industry.

About Western Truck Insurance Services

Western Truck Insurance Services is a commercial truck insurance agency with roots dating back to 1954. We have evolved into a highly respected, professionally managed, truck and transportation insurance brokerage. The hallmark of our organization is our desire to provide unparalleled service. We go way beyond what you expect to receive from an insurance brokerage. Equipped with state of the art automation, Western Truck Insurance can provide you with lightning fast truck insurance quotes, customer service, Insurance certificates, and coverage changes.

Important Insurance Considerations for Flatbed Trucks

Flatbed trucks are larger than normal trucks that carry heavy loads, including heavy machinery, steel, vehicles, and more. Because of a flatbed’s payload and its design, the goods that are being shipped are more vulnerable to external exposures, and the trucks themselves are inherently more of a liability on the road when it comes to overall safety and risk.

From potholes to bumpy roads and sudden stops in traffic, flatbed trucks can create a lot more unique risk compared to other trucks on the road. Fortunately, flatbed truck insurance can be purchased and installed to protect not only the drivers and the trucking company but also the cargo being trucked and others on the road.

Here are some things to consider when it comes to insuring flatbed trucks.

Auto Liability Insurance

Having auto liability insurance helps cover legal obligations to other drivers on the road when an accident occurs. This kind of insurance can help cover legal expenses if extreme cases are brought up, like being sued. This kind of truck insurance contains two different policies, including bodily injury and property damage.

For bodily injury, this form of liability coverage covers the medical expenses, lost wages, and pain of the other driver or drivers involved. For property damage, this liability covers the repair or replacement of the other driver’s vehicle if a truck driver is found to be at-fault in an accident. This also covers other property that may have been damaged in an accident, including buildings.

Physical Damage

Having auto liability insurance will protect other drivers on the road and the financials of the person or company that has the insurance. However, it won’t cover damages to a truck if an accident occurs or if something else happens to it. That’s where physical damage comes in to help. This is the kind of trucking insurance that will help to protect the overall investment in the truck.

For physical damage, you can go two routes, including collision and comprehensive coverage. For collision coverage, this helps when it comes to replacing or repairing your flatbed truck if you’re in an accident or if the truck is damaged by running into something. For comprehensive coverage, this can help with repairing or replacing a truck is needed due to something other than an accident damaging it, such as a fire, vandalism, falling objects, or animals.

General Liability

Trucker’s general liability insurance can help to protect against claims of bodily injury or property damage caused by the typical daily use of a truck for business purposes. This coverage can help when claims are made against a driver or your business for the services you provide. From loading at a dock to work at a job site, having general liability is a basic first line of defense when it comes to protecting your business.

Cargo Insurance

Beyond protecting against people or buildings, flatbed truck insurance should also be purchased to protect the cargo involved in everyday business. The loads that are being carried are valuable as well as hefty and awkward to load. Cargo insurance is an option to add on that protects the loads of cargo you’re hauling against things like theft, fire, or collision.

About Western Truck Insurance Services

Western Truck Insurance Services is a commercial truck insurance agency with roots dating back to 1954. We have evolved into a highly respected, professionally managed, truck and transportation insurance brokerage. The hallmark of our organization is our desire to provide unparalleled service. We go way beyond what you expect to receive from an insurance brokerage. Equipped with state of the art automation, Western Truck Insurance can provide you with lightning fast truck insurance quotes, customer service, Insurance certificates, and coverage changes.

Truck Stop Cargo Thefts: What Can Be Done

Cargo theft of freight trucks on the road has always been a prevalent threat to freight companies. And even though numbers are down, with the uptick in e-commerce and electronics pose a potential threat for trucking companies and their clients. Drivers will park their truck at a stop, go inside to rest, and then come out to an empty parking spot.

According to data, there were 157 cargo thefts reported in the second quarter of 2018 in the United States and Canada. The average cargo value per theft event came in at $187,000, totaling $29.3 million in losses in that quarter alone. With this in mind, it’s important to note how to minimize these risks. Here are some tips to do so.

Understand How Cargo Theft Occurs

The most important part of preventing cargo theft is by understanding how it occurs. With new ELD regulations set, truck drivers have to take more frequent stops, opening up more opportunities for theft to occur when they’re stopped. There are things drivers can do to protect cargo when they are stopped. Another thing to consider is understanding what is targeted, such as pharmaceuticals, food, and electronics.

Be Aware of Your Surroundings

Employers should provide training to prevent cargo theft and to know how to respond if drivers are put in a situation where freight is stolen. There should be a culture of education and security in every freight company, and all employees should be aware of cargo theft and hijacking.

Drivers should pay attention to their surroundings when they are stopped at a rest stop or truck stop. Be aware while your truck is parked and inquire with truck stop management as to the security on premises, including surveillance cameras and guards. Keep your truck in sights of the cameras as any footage may be able to capture the license plate or face of a thief or thieves.

Insure Your Truck

Trucking companies can protect not only the goods they are hauling but the drivers and the actual trucks themselves. Comprehensive motor truck cargo insurance is a full-spectrum approach to protecting these entities in the event of a theft. After you’re left picking up the pieces, so to speak, having motor truck cargo insurance in place will provide financial restoration after a loss.

Use Technology

GPS tracking devices and security seals are becoming more commonplace and prices are becoming more and more reasonable. GPS tracking devices can be placed on the vehicle and trailer as well as the goods inside the truck. If your truck falls victim to theft, it’s likely that a full loss won’t be taken and you may be able to recover some of all of the items that were taken.

It’s also important to use technology to boost communication between drivers and security in the company. If cargo is left unattended for a period of time, this should be made known. There are many different available resources available to keep trucks and trailers secure.

About Western Truck Insurance Services

Western Truck Insurance Services is a commercial truck insurance agency with roots dating back to 1954. We have evolved into a highly respected, professionally managed, truck and transportation insurance brokerage. The hallmark of our organization is our desire to provide unparalleled service. We go way beyond what you expect to receive from an insurance brokerage. Equipped with state of the art automation, Western Truck Insurance can provide you with lightning fast truck insurance quotes, customer service, Insurance certificates, and coverage changes.

How Truck Drivers Can Stay Protected from the Sun

Being a truck driver presents a number of risks while traveling from highway to highway. Car wrecks, loss or damage to freight, engine trouble and more are just some of the ways in which a day behind the wheel can take a turn for the worse. But one risk that isn’t discussed as thoroughly is damage to a truck driver’s skin after years on the open road.

Truck drivers literally face irreparable damage, including skin cancer, every day they get behind the wheel and head out for long hauls. Trucking companies should keep information available for their drivers and avoid liability risks related to claims of skin cancer or eye issues. Having commercial truck insurance can help protect trucking companies, but keeping drivers protected first should be the goal. It’s important to sport the signs of sun damage and make moves on limiting risk over time.

Here are some ideas on how to stay protected from the sun.

Know the Signs of Sun Damage

First, it’s important to be aware of sun damage and look out for its effects early on. Even minimal sun exposure to one side of your face can cause skin cancer to develop and cause more harm over the years. Drivers should be looking out for spider veins, skin spots, and freckles that are out of the ordinary, and check on skin texture too.

Too much sunlight causes the collagen in your skin to break down, which prevents your skin from creating new collagen to repair itself over time. Even if the side effects of sun exposure are discovered, it may be too late to take action.

Use Sunscreen Every Day

Step number one is making sure to lather up on good quality sunscreen every single day, no questions asked. It’s a simple step that drivers can do right before they take off for the day. Your windows may be able to filter out the sun’s UVB rays, but they won’t do anything to stop the more harmful UVA rays from coming in. This is why we suggest a broad-spectrum sunscreen because it offers up protection for the skin from both types of solar radiation. Start out with an SPF 30 then move up from there if need be.

Avoid Peak Hours

Between 10am and 2pm, the sun’s rays are at their strongest. While driving can’t be avoided during those hours every day, it is important to take extra care of your skin. Try to take walks and breaks during the morning and evening hours to avoid sunlight, but still remember to put on sunscreen and stay in the shade as much as possible.

Change Your Clothes

While this is a good rule of thumb anyway, changing up what you wear can be helpful in keeping sunlight away from you and damaging your skin further. A simple way to protect yourself from the sun’s harmful effects is to wear clothes that shield your skin. During the summer, try to wear long-sleeved shirts, long pants, and hats that cover face and neck.

Wear Some Shades

Eye care is just as important as skin care when it comes to sun damage. Don’t overlook eye care when it comes to this part of the job as you need to be able to see well when you’re taking care of your operations. Invest in some high-quality sunglasses that polarize the sunlight coming through and filter out the bad rays. This will help to keep visibility high while maintaining safety from the sun.

About Western Truck Insurance Services

Western Truck Insurance Services is a commercial truck insurance agency with roots dating back to 1954. We have evolved into a highly respected, professionally managed, truck and transportation insurance brokerage. The hallmark of our organization is our desire to provide unparalleled service. We go way beyond what you expect to receive from an insurance brokerage. Equipped with state of the art automation, Western Truck Insurance can provide you with lightning fast truck insurance quotes, customer service, Insurance certificates, and coverage changes.

How to Recruit and Retain Skilled Truck Drivers

Turnover in the trucking industry is reaching high levels as older generations of drivers begin to phase out and recruitment efforts to reach younger drivers hasn’t created many opportunities. The trucking industry is already facing a massive shortage with more of a problem to come in the next decade as current drivers are starting to end their driving careers. In fact, companies already need about 60,000 drivers to fill positions, with another 40,000 estimated in the next few years.

The pressure is on trucking companies to not only recruit drivers but retain them for generations to come. With turnover rates near 100 percent, companies will have to replace nearly all drivers within the next couple of years to meet the rising demands of the freight market.

Incentivize Employees

Trucking companies have enough on their hands when it comes to meeting the rise in demand and having to handle employee turnover is only adding to the stress. Trucking companies can calm the stress of their employees by rewarding their hard work and timely deliveries with better incentives that can act as goal markers for drivers.

Some trucking companies have found success in offering more benefits and bonuses to truckers on a regular basis, like every six months or so. From meeting fuel efficiency and safety goals to getting deliveries done on schedule on a regular time frame, companies should can encourage their employees to work hard and get recognized for it.

Insure the Future

No one wants to work with risk hanging over their head, that includes trucking professionals. Trucking companies can make sure to ensure their future is safe through opting for comprehensive truck insurance that provides safety and long-term protection for their operations and employees. Truck insurance can help keep everything from cargo to employees to finances safe in the event of an accident, loss or damage. There are many different obstacles that trucking operations face, so having this peace of mind will help, especially when trying to retain drivers for future generations.

Provide the Right Benefits

One thing that will keep truck drivers on the payroll and making trips in full and on time is providing the right benefits that will go the extra mile. Many trucking companies are now opting to boost their health coverage benefits to attract younger and healthier drivers who are planning for a future. Other benefits include paid vacation days, sick time and 401(k)’s that will appeal to drivers in any phase in their career who are wanting to plan for a future.

The main point here is looking years down the road for a stable employee base. Programs that offer employees some equity in a trucking operation like a stock ownership plan is another way to entice employees to literally invest in their future with a company. Having built-in benefits can help attract new employees looking for a change of pace in their career as well as retain drivers who may be considering a change of their own.

Show Appreciation

Truck drivers spend long hours on the road, hauling freight for days and even weeks at a time. This takes them away from their home, their families, and their own free time. Companies need to adjust their operations and formulate programs in which drivers can still have a healthy personal and home life while also meeting the demands of clients.

Companies can build a team-oriented culture that puts a focus on the health and well-being of drivers. Drivers should be offered the same benefits and perks that are provided in other industries, and there should also be a stress on keeping lines of communication open to hear their ideas and field their feedback.

About Western Truck Insurance Services

Western Truck Insurance Services is a commercial truck insurance agency with roots dating back to 1954. We have evolved into a highly respected, professionally managed, truck and transportation insurance brokerage. The hallmark of our organization is our desire to provide unparalleled service. We go way beyond what you expect to receive from an insurance brokerage. Equipped with state of the art automation, Western Truck Insurance can provide you with lightning fast truck insurance quotes, customer service, Insurance certificates and coverage changes.

The Biggest Reasons Why Truck Drivers Quit

The trucking industry is in the middle of big upheaval. With the advent of sophisticated technology, such as autonomous trucks and a focus on data, truck drivers are finding their roles changing at a rapid rate. In fact, the industry is already in the middle of huge changes in the turnover of trucking professionals creating the need to fill vacant and soon-to-be vacant roles.

As the older generation of truck drivers begin to retire the American Trucking Association puts the number of truck drivers needed in the next few years between 60,000 upwards of 100,000. But even without the phasing out of one generation and the boost in tech-driven trucks, the industry still sees a great deal of its drivers quit due to a number of avoidable reasons.

Here are some reasons why truck drivers tend to call it quits.

Money Issues

Pay is always a huge problem in the trucking industry. Drivers can see crazy schedules keeping them up long hours and away from home for days or even weeks at a time depending on their routes. One thing that makes this kind of life worth it is a decent wage, but some drivers find that that may not be enough. A driver can never fully tell what they’ll make week-to-week, which only adds more stress to an already stressful job.

More Time at Home

Piggybacking off the previous notes, drivers can end up being away from their loved ones for longer than they want to. While being away for a certain amount of time is in the job description, it can take a toll on a driver’s home life and road life. Trucking companies can help by accommodating home life schedules or time off requests that allow for more agreeable time off.

Lack of Insurance for Drivers

Commercial truck insurance plays a role on both sides of the coin; for both the trucker and the company they work for. Having the proper commercial truck insurance can provide the financial protection a company needs when an incident occurs on the road or a when a claim is made by a professional driver. When a company doesn’t invest properly in commercial truck insurance it may signal the driver that management is not looking out for the well-being of everyone in the operation.

Appreciation

Many drivers walk away from their job because they feel let down by management, and not appreciated enough for the grueling job they do every day. Drivers want to know what’s expected of them, to see growth in the company they work for, and how it affects their future. To address this issue, companies and leaders need to deliver on their promises and commitments. Communication is huge and should be a major component of the daily operations side of a trucking company to keep transparency and support open and fluid.

About Western Truck Insurance Services

Western Truck Insurance Services is a commercial truck insurance agency with roots dating back to 1954. We have evolved into a highly respected, professionally managed, truck and transportation insurance brokerage. The hallmark of our organization is our desire to provide unparalleled service. We go way beyond what you expect to receive from an insurance brokerage. Equipped with state of the art automation, Western Truck Insurance can provide you with lightning fast truck insurance quotes, customer service, Insurance certificates and coverage changes.

The Most Common Causes of Truck Insurance Claims

Trucking companies put a lot on the line when their drivers are out on the road. Not only are there logistical matters to tend to, such as getting orders delivered in full and on time, but there are safety concerns to keep in mind. There are a number of reasons why things might not go according to plan for every freight assignment, which is why truck insurance options are there for trucking companies looking to keep their operations financially supported.

According to the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), upwards of 475,000 crashes involving large commercial vehicles in the United States each year. This leads to costly losses that can do damage against a trucking company’s reputation and overall business growth. That’s why trucking liability insurance is a mandatory item, and that’s why it’s important to know the major causes of truck insurance claims.

Vehicle Breakdown

It’s every truck driver’s nightmare—being stranded on the side of the road with no help in sight. From flat tires to overheating to issues with brakes, there is a host of issues that can leave a commercial truck in the lurch.

For the latter, the FMCSA put out a study about brake-related issues. What the study found was that brakes have accounted for 29 percent of semi-truck accidents. A truck’s disc and drum brakes are exposed to consistent heat, pressure and friction, which, combined, cause wear and tear, especially without regular maintenance.

Driver Error

Truck drivers are just like regular commuters in that they have the same kinds of distractions when they’re behind the wheel. But it can be argued that they have it worse because of many other factors and things to consider.

If a truck driver is hauling freight too fast, it takes longer to slow down, which can lead to an accident. There are also recognition errors to consider, such as driver distraction, or performance issues that include overcompensating on the road while trying to make turns.

Loss & Damage

No matter what a truck driver carries on board, it’s all precious cargo. Whether it’s automobiles, electronics, or stuffed animals, all products on a truck have value to their owner. When a loss happens, this can cause a major worry for a client and bring about truck insurance claims that a trucking company doesn’t look forward to dealing with.

When a load is lost, the freight on the original bill of lading doesn’t make it to its destination. Or when something is damaged, it’s an issue related to the overall integrity of the products onboard. If there’s anything out of order or a problem with delivery, a trucking company can see major claims made against them.

About Western Truck Insurance Services

Western Truck Insurance Services is a commercial truck insurance agency with roots dating back to 1954. We have evolved into a highly respected, professionally managed, truck and transportation insurance brokerage. The hallmark of our organization is our desire to provide unparalleled service. We go way beyond what you expect to receive from an insurance brokerage. Equipped with state of the art automation, Western Truck Insurance can provide you with lightning fast truck insurance quotes, customer service, Insurance certificates and coverage changes.