AB-5 Signed Into Law: What That Means for Truck Drivers

This past September, California Governor Gavin Newsom signed into law new legislation focused on making things a little more difficult for independent owner-operators, such as truck drivers and gig economy workers, possibly even putting them out of business.

The AB-5 legislation originally passed the California State Assembly back in May and was passed by the state Senate on September 10. What it does is move last year’s Dynamex California Supreme Court decision into law, which established an ABC test to determine the status of an independent contractor that could essentially eliminate the owner-operator model in California, and disrupting everything from investing in commercial truck insurance, such as general liability insurance, and the sharing economy.

Taking effect starting January 1, 2020, those in the trucking industry could find themselves in the crosshairs. So, what does this all mean for trucking professionals?

Trucking Companies and Professionals in AB-5

While there is little proof that trucking professionals and companies have abused the independent contractor model in the state, AB-5 is still in place to essentially paint with a broad brush in banning the use of independent contractors rather than deal with individual abuses.

The state’s trucking industry has been trying to work with legislators to find exceptions for legitimate independent contractors who follow the rules. Many workers are exempted from this ruling, like doctors, dentists, and engineers, but not trucking or gig economy workers, like those working for Lyft or Uber.

The new bill does not necessarily distinguish between a driver who’s an independent contractor under a truck lease-program and someone who owns their own truck. Those opposed to the ruling argue that this essentially destroys the independent contractor model for trucking.

In California, there are more than small 136,000 trucking companies that are locally owned with small fleets and independent drivers who take care of their operations. This means that motor carriers and owner-operators are left in the lurch trying to figure out a strategy for what they can do now.

California is currently experiencing a truck driver shortage, much like the rest of the nation, but maybe even more so, since the state is highly dependent on the flow of goods coming from Mexico or Arizona. The new measure may aggravate the issue at hand by removing thousands of drivers from the road because of de-classifying them.

Currently, there are lawsuits that have been filed to fight the issue and look for ways to exempt these companies and their drivers from the classification. Additionally, companies like Uber, Lyft, and DoorDash, all dependent upon independent contractors, have invested in a collective of $90 million to bring this issue to the ballot during the next voting season.

About Western Truck Insurance Services

Western Truck Insurance Services is a commercial truck insurance agency with roots dating back to 1954. We have evolved into a highly respected, professionally managed, truck and transportation insurance brokerage. The hallmark of our organization is our desire to provide unparalleled service. We go way beyond what you expect to receive from an insurance brokerage. Equipped with state of the art automation, Western Truck Insurance can provide you with lightning fast truck insurance quotes, customer service, Insurance certificates, and coverage changes.

Intentional Pairing: An Operations Change That Could Lead to Lowered Trucking Costs

Trucking companies have been operating with drop-and-hook operations for some time hoping to maximize efficiency. But while many trucking companies stick with this method, there’s little focus when it comes to matching tractors. In a new report from the North American Council for Freight Efficiency (NACFE), it’s pointed out that a change in operations to allow for more intentional pairing as it’s known could lower overall trucking costs and have more room for needful assets such as hiring and truck insurance.

But while it’s projected to help with efficiency and cut costs, some leaders in the industry argue against pairing, saying that while it’s a good idea, it’s not really feasible. Even with a net improvement of five to 10 percent, as stated by the NACFE, the case to change things up may not be compelling enough.

Studying The Road

In the study, titled “The Feasibility of Intentional Pairing,” the NACFE portrays pairing as a dream for engineers, allowing for the design of an integrated tractor-trailer combination to be operated in a cost-cutting way. The report, which spans 86 pages, outlines everything needed to change for a complete overhaul of how things get done on the road through pairing. Through a survey of 50 fleets, including big names in the industry like Werner, UPS, and PepsiCo, NACFE found that the majority of fleets operate in drop-and-hook with the focus on keeping the trailer in motion as much as possible.

The benefits of pairing would be on a sliding scale according to the NACFE’s findings. Fleet annual net MPGs would improve and intentionally pairing by model type would provide the best opportunity for gains on the road.

The ability to pull this kind of move off is still questionable as many variables are involved and would require a whole new way to go about moving freight around. From time to pricing to asset location, it’s not a one-size-fits-all solution to an issue.

According to the NACFE, a growing number of GPS tracking systems and more data does present a new opportunity for a more efficient asset optimization in certain applications of freight, such as shipping beverages around. These commodities already operate in a certain manner as fleets pair weight-reduced tractors with weight-reduced trailers to maximize payload.

Altogether, NACFE, concluded that intentional pairing, while a great idea, and something to look forward to in the future, is not a full-fledged reality at this point. But the new technology does offer up opportunities through asset tracking and asset management. With data available around these entities, including driver information, tractor characteristics, asset status, locads, weather, and routes, better operational decisions can be made.

By combining this with the vehicle data, it could allow fleets to match trucks to certain shipping situations. Lightweight tractors could be paired up with lightweight trailers in order to maximize payload potential, even if it’s resulted in a shorter lifespan for those assets. Tractors with down-sped transmissions could be used for routes where technology can best be of benefit.

About Western Truck Insurance Services

Western Truck Insurance Services is a commercial truck insurance agency with roots dating back to 1954. We have evolved into a highly respected, professionally managed, truck and transportation insurance brokerage. The hallmark of our organization is our desire to provide unparalleled service. We go way beyond what you expect to receive from an insurance brokerage. Equipped with state of the art automation, Western Truck Insurance can provide you with lightning fast truck insurance quotes, customer service, Insurance certificates, and coverage changes.

Trucking Through the Mountains? Make Sure to Practice Safe Driving

Anyone getting behind the wheel of a big rig, no matter if they’re a seasoned trucking veteran or a newbie on the road, needs to be on their guard when driving through mountain ranges of any kind. From slick roads to low visibility to other dangers like falling rocks, there are plenty of risks waiting around every twisting turn for truck drivers.

Slick roads, weather, terrible road conditions, and distracted driving can all lead to major problems, including accidents and fatalities on the road. It’s important for truck drivers and the companies they work for to take heed of important tips that can help everyone and everything stay safe through a mountain range.

Keep an Eye on the Weather

Before a trip into and through the mountains, it’s important to know the weather along your intended route. There are so many weather apps available today to stay informed and help prepare for a trip. Weather conditions can change dramatically, and unexpectedly, with altitude, If tire chains are allowed, or required, make sure to have the correct number and size of chains.

Drive Slow and Steady

Truck drivers should be extra cautious when driving up or down hills, and especially when the road becomes windy. Pay attention to grade signs as they are meant to provide the right information needed to operate the truck safely. A general rule of thumb is to travel down the grade in one gear lower than you traveled up the other side. When on the ascent, choose a gear where you can pull the grade without having to downshift and maintain a steady mid-range RPM.

Be Prepared

Truck drivers should look into the status of their brake system. Having a properly maintained brake system, including the engine brake, and tires are critical maintenance components to travel through the mountains safely and effectively. Most roadways will have brake check areas for drivers to pull off to the side and adjust the brakes, if need be, before heading down a descent.

Runaway Lanes

Speaking of pulling off to the side, truck drivers should take advantage of runaway lanes on the sides of routes. If you are losing control or have lost control of the vehicle on a descent, make sure to use these lanes. They are available for the safety of the driver, the truck, and everyone around on the road.

Keep from Tailgating

No one likes to drive with someone directly behind them, right on their bumper. But when it’s a large truck carrying plenty of heavy cargo, this is even more important to note. Truck drivers should be sure to not tailgate and stay back with a significant amount of distance between them and the car ahead.

Staying Safe with Insurance

Truck drivers should be sure to invest in effective commercial truck insurance which can provide the right level of protection following incidents on the road. Trucking companies should make sure to look over their current level of commercial truck insurance and adjust accordingly to keep trucks, cargo, drivers, and others on the road protected.

About Western Truck Insurance Services

Western Truck Insurance Services is a commercial truck insurance agency with roots dating back to 1954. We have evolved into a highly respected, professionally managed, truck and transportation insurance brokerage. The hallmark of our organization is our desire to provide unparalleled service. We go way beyond what you expect to receive from an insurance brokerage. Equipped with state of the art automation, Western Truck Insurance can provide you with lightning fast truck insurance quotes, customer service, Insurance certificates, and coverage changes.

Compliance Requirements for California Vehicles

In recent years, California has seen a number of regulations change or be created in order to cut down on emissions, greenhouse gases, and traffic while boosting alternative fuels, for example. One industry affected by new rules and regulations is the freight industry, or trucking, which plays a huge role in the state’s economy.

Last year, California saw record-setting levels of freight-hauling demand and driver pay as trucking levels reached a 20-year high. From produce to animals to tech commodities, California sees high numbers of trucking freight hit the roads. But State regulations of trucking and bus operations are finding numerous ways to hit the trucking industry.

Here is a better look at how compliance requirements in California are affecting the freight and transportation industries.

Vehicles Affected by Regulations

The Truck and Bus regulation affects individuals, private companies, and Federal agencies that own and operate diesel vehicles that weigh in at more than 14,000 pounds. But it also extends out to publicly and privately owned school buses, even though their compliance requirements differ. Local and state government vehicles aren’t affected by the regulations because they are already subject to other regulations.

Heavier Trucks and Buses

Heavier trucks and buses on the road that weigh more than 26,000 pounds must comply with a set schedule by engine model year or owners can report to show compliance with more options. Engines made any time after 1996 should have an OEM or retrofit PM filter installed as vehicles made prior to 1996 should have already been replaced by January 1, 2015. The goal from the state is to have all trucks and buses driving with 2010 model engines by January 1, 2023.

PM Filters

Some trucking companies and individual owners have sought more information on PM filter installations. These are the filters that reduce particulate matter and cut down on smog and pollution. Owners who did not install PM filters before January 1, 2014, and do not use flexibility options are required to replace existing trucks according to their model year schedule.

Getting hit with fines can be costly and sideline a trucking company’s business altogether; especially smaller companies that can’t afford to have their trucks sit while they work on getting compliant, which is also a costly endeavor. While not all claims can be held off, there are options to keep fines low and representation costs minimized. Through comprehensive truck insurance, trucking companies can limit their exposures and make sure the increased values of their equipment are properly protected.

What About Lighter Trucks?

Lighter trucks and buses that fit right in the middle of that 14,000-26,000-pound window already had engine replacement requirements set on January 1, 2015. Lighter vehicles with engines that are more than 20 years old need to be replaced with newer trucks or engines, and beginning January 1 of next year, all remaining vehicles who have yet to take this step need to have 2010 engines or newer.

About Western Truck Insurance Services

Western Truck Insurance Services is a commercial truck insurance agency with roots dating back to 1954. We have evolved into a highly respected, professionally managed, truck and transportation insurance brokerage. The hallmark of our organization is our desire to provide unparalleled service. We go way beyond what you expect to receive from an insurance brokerage. Equipped with state of the art automation, Western Truck Insurance can provide you with lightning fast truck insurance quotes, customer service, Insurance certificates, and coverage changes.

In 2019, Independent Truck Drivers Are Earning More Than Company Drivers

Striking out on your own and working in the gig economy may seem like a risky endeavor for people working in tech or the arts. But one area where being self-employed is actually coming out ahead is in the trucking business. Self-employed truck drivers, also known as owner-operators, earn more per hour and work longer, or have more business opportunities, than company drivers.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, in a May 2018 report, the average truck driver salary hovers around $43,680 a year. The average salary for owner-operators, which make up about 11 percent of the trucking industry, comes in about 5 percent higher. Plus, in the spirit of making their own schedule, these drivers can take on more work as they please.

Let’s take a better look at what’s impacting this trend.

Trending Up

Among workers across all jobs in the industry, self-employment has been heading lower on a steady basis, even with increasing numbers during economic downturns when workers who are laid off turn to self-employment. Considering other factors such as age, education, sex, and family status, self-employed truck drivers earn about five percent more per hour compared to company drivers, bringing their average salary up to about $45,500 annually.

But factoring in more availability to take on more work and you have more earning potential and a more attractive opportunity for drivers to go out on their own. The income and hours advantage among the self-employed does not necessarily hold up in other industries that employ large numbers of employees with the same kind of demographic profile. Think mining, food service, construction.

Not Guaranteed

This advantage for self-employed drivers may not be a uniform opportunity for all in the industry. While it may be attractive to work for yourself, make your own schedule, and earn more money, getting additional jobs and a steady stream of work may not be a guarantee.

The best owner-operators have the potential to earn more money per hour, but some actually end up taking a loss compared to company drivers. The top group of owner-operators earns 52 percent more per hour than their company driver counterparts, which comes out to about $19,000 more. But the bottom level of drivers actually earns as little as 30 percent less than regular drivers.

What’s more, you have to be willing to work longer hours if you want to be self-employed on the road. On average, owner-operators put in an extra hour a week behind the wheel. It may not seem like much, but it’s the pace that drivers have to keep up with in order to earn more that may grind away at them after a while.

Also, there are risks built in when it comes to working as an owner-operator. Self-employed drivers are more exposed to variables in the trucking industry that could affect their opportunities and wages, plus they have to pay their own commercial truck insurance and take care of their own maintenance fees. If a mechanical issue arises, commercial truck insurance won’t be able to protect an owner-operator. But even with these risks, there are owner-operators willing to go it alone and boost their own opportunities. Being a self-employed driver can be a lucrative endeavor that also provides an enviable level of autonomy that others want.

About Western Truck Insurance Services

Western Truck Insurance Services is a commercial truck insurance agency with roots dating back to 1954. We have evolved into a highly respected, professionally managed, truck and transportation insurance brokerage. The hallmark of our organization is our desire to provide unparalleled service. We go way beyond what you expect to receive from an insurance brokerage. Equipped with state of the art automation, Western Truck Insurance can provide you with lightning fast truck insurance quotes, customer service, Insurance certificates, and coverage changes.

In the Trucking Insurance Market, High Liability Rates Are Increasingly Common

Liability coverage makes up a big part of an independent insurance cost. This pays out injuries and property damage after a wreck. When it comes to over-the-road drivers or long-haul truck drivers, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) requires that a $750,000 minimum limit be met for the primary auto liability coverage. However, most shippers and brokers in the industry won’t set up a business relationship with trucking companies that carry anything less than $1 in truck insurance liability.

Rising Costs

Liability coverage costs have gone up year over year and don’t seem to be slowing down. Premiums for a $1 million liability policy can now range between $6,000 and $16,000 depending on the carrier and influencing factors. These high liability rates are becoming more and more common in the trucking industry, making it hard for trucking companies to factor in their budget.

So, what caused this boost in pricing?

According to our President, Bob Holtzman, it can be taken back to the 2008 recession.

Holtzman recently told Overdriveonline.com that the “marketplace was competing for what business was still there, and rates got really low.”

As the economy made a rebound, insurers were slow to react and started seeing losses take their hold well in excess of premiums. In the last few years, truck insurers increased their rates and today’s rates are much higher than the low rates seen around 2011. These rates are expected to hover around those numbers mentioned above for the next few years.

The economy has picked up in recent years, during the end of the Obama administration and into the Trump years, resulting in plenty of jobs and higher wages becoming the norm. Also, there have been more motorists on the road, as well as, more freight, especially with the influence of e-commerce freight.

These factors and others, such as the type of freight, age of equipment, typical length of haul, and states that see freight driving through, all play a role in greater claims frequency which corresponds to increasing liability rates.

In the past few years, as independent contractors have seen an increase in contracts, applications for new operating authority has increased as well. With this in mind, obtaining liability coverage has become a major challenge for those new ventures looking to make a step forward. But since the market has tightened, many truck insurance companies have instituted stricter requirements when it comes to operating experience.

About Western Truck Insurance Services

Western Truck Insurance Services is a commercial truck insurance agency with roots dating back to 1954. We have evolved into a highly respected, professionally managed, truck and transportation insurance brokerage. The hallmark of our organization is our desire to provide unparalleled service. We go way beyond what you expect to receive from an insurance brokerage. Equipped with state of the art automation, Western Truck Insurance can provide you with lightning fast truck insurance quotes, customer service, Insurance certificates, and coverage changes.

AB 5 Passes California State Senate Hearing – What Does this Mean?

In California, the trucking industry is in the middle of a legislative upheaval over certain exemptions and tests for truck drivers on the state’s highways. Legislation that could disrupt the owner-operator trucking model in California is headed to Governor Gavin Newsom’s desk to be signed.

Assembly Bill 5 (AB5) passed the state senate’s Standing Committee on Labor, Public Employment and Retirement by a 4 to 1 vote, opening to door to codify the ABC test for employee status prescribed in the 2018 Dynamex decision.

Supporting the legislation would help to seek to protect workers from employers that attempt to classify them as independent contractors instead of employees. It could also affect the price of ride-sharing apps like Uber and Lyft, which will likely create higher prices for consumers.

What the Bill Is

Under the bill, many workers who are currently under the label of independent contractor would be considered employees. This would make them subject to the state labor laws in California. What’s more, employers would have to pay payroll taxes, provide benefits, overtime, minimum wage, workers’ compensation and, in many cases, also provide the commercial truck insurance.

Opposing the Bill

The bill in its current form would hurt the owner-operators who want to stay independent. The test, which designates employee status in the legislation, provides no leeway for independent truck drivers who work with other trucking companies; including truck brokers. Trucking associations, such as the Western States Trucking Association (WSTA) have come out against the bill. They warn that the liabilities that come from it would hit employers as a result of reclassification and would ultimately lead to many, if not most, refusing to work with owner-operators.

What Happens Now?

Now, the future of the legislation is still a bit hazy. AB5 needs to be taken up by the state Senate’s Appropriations Committee, which won’t happen until later this month after the legislature’s recess is up. From there, the bill would go to the Senate floor for a major vote. If successful there, it then passes on to the Assembly chamber for a concurrence vote.

In the end, if it hurdles over those steps, the bill would then head to Gov. Newsom for signing, although Newsom does have the power to veto. Another hitch is that the bill needs to be passed by September 13 when it would die if not written into law.

Make sure to check back for future updates on this legislation.

About Western Truck Insurance Services

Western Truck Insurance Servicesis a commercial truck insurance agency with roots dating back to 1954. We have evolved into a highly respected, professionally managed, truck and transportation insurance brokerage. The hallmark of our organization is our desire to provide unparalleled service. We go way beyond what you expect to receive from an insurance brokerage. Equipped with state of the art automation, Western Truck Insurance can provide you with lightning fast truck insurance quotes, customer service, Insurance certificates, and coverage changes.

Driver-Facing Cameras in Trucking Operations: Yea or Nay?

The commercial trucking industry is in the middle of a major overhaul right now. From a massive labor shortage to the electric and autonomous truck markets developing at a fast pace, trucking isn’t the same as it has traditionally been, and is expected to continue in this way in the coming years.

One trend that is kicking up some controversy is the installation around installing driver-facing cameras in truck cabins. This issue has created issues around privacy and accountability and has even opened up new stipulations around commercial truck insurance.

Front-facing cameras, recording what’s going on surrounding the truck, have been used for years now, which has helped with security and legal issues, such as proving fault in something like an accident involving a commercial truck. But does this technology cross the line? How effective can it be?

Drivers as Assets

Technology is painting a picture of a driverless future as companies like TuSimple and Uber are already officially running their autonomous trucks on highways for long-haul projects. But until this becomes a full-scale reality, drivers are still the number one asset for the industry, especially for short-range projects, which will still see truckers in the driver’s seat even with self-driving trucks on the road.

And while truckers are valued in the industry and play a pivotal role in the entire freight industry when it comes to preventing a backlog, telling them cameras will be watching them may not be well-received. In an article from American Trucker, the consensus from those doing the driving aren’t on board for this addition to their operations. And with a shortage of 180,000 drivers expected by 2024, the industry can’t afford to lose any more favor.

Short-Term Effects

Installing driver-facing cameras that monitor drivers with the goals of monitoring performance and raising accountability may have short-term effects, such as causing them to drive more carefully or reducing their speed. But over time, drivers may forget the cameras are there or simply turn a blind eye, so to speak, when it comes to having their every move being watched.

On the other hand, for trucking operations, driver-facing cameras can be beneficial for a number of reasons. These recordings can be used as coaching tools to help with onboarding and adjusting performance expectations. And when it comes to accidents, driver-facing cameras can also help with proving fault or innocence when related to commercial truck insurance claims in incidents.

Other Considerations

Trucking companies can begin looking for feedback from driver recruiters and safety managers to highlight the pros and cons of having this kind of surveillance installed. Will it make the job easier or more stressful? What’re the long-term effects of how these cameras can help with performance?

Finally, the drivers themselves should also be considered in decision-making since it will be their jobs and reputations on the line. Surveyed drivers in the recruiting process can be asked if they would consider not taking a job if it included working under the watchful eye of a camera. Bottom line, discussions should continue and opinions should be expressed during planning and execution of this kind of change to the industry.

About Western Truck Insurance Services

Western Truck Insurance Services is a commercial truck insurance agency with roots dating back to 1954. We have evolved into a highly respected, professionally managed, truck and transportation insurance brokerage. The hallmark of our organization is our desire to provide unparalleled service. We go way beyond what you expect to receive from an insurance brokerage. Equipped with state of the art automation, Western Truck Insurance can provide you with lightning fast truck insurance quotes, customer service, Insurance certificates, and coverage changes.

Important Insurance Considerations for Flatbed Trucks

Flatbed trucks are larger than normal trucks that carry heavy loads, including heavy machinery, steel, vehicles, and more. Because of a flatbed’s payload and its design, the goods that are being shipped are more vulnerable to external exposures, and the trucks themselves are inherently more of a liability on the road when it comes to overall safety and risk.

From potholes to bumpy roads and sudden stops in traffic, flatbed trucks can create a lot more unique risk compared to other trucks on the road. Fortunately, flatbed truck insurance can be purchased and installed to protect not only the drivers and the trucking company but also the cargo being trucked and others on the road.

Here are some things to consider when it comes to insuring flatbed trucks.

Auto Liability Insurance

Having auto liability insurance helps cover legal obligations to other drivers on the road when an accident occurs. This kind of insurance can help cover legal expenses if extreme cases are brought up, like being sued. This kind of truck insurance contains two different policies, including bodily injury and property damage.

For bodily injury, this form of liability coverage covers the medical expenses, lost wages, and pain of the other driver or drivers involved. For property damage, this liability covers the repair or replacement of the other driver’s vehicle if a truck driver is found to be at-fault in an accident. This also covers other property that may have been damaged in an accident, including buildings.

Physical Damage

Having auto liability insurance will protect other drivers on the road and the financials of the person or company that has the insurance. However, it won’t cover damages to a truck if an accident occurs or if something else happens to it. That’s where physical damage comes in to help. This is the kind of trucking insurance that will help to protect the overall investment in the truck.

For physical damage, you can go two routes, including collision and comprehensive coverage. For collision coverage, this helps when it comes to replacing or repairing your flatbed truck if you’re in an accident or if the truck is damaged by running into something. For comprehensive coverage, this can help with repairing or replacing a truck is needed due to something other than an accident damaging it, such as a fire, vandalism, falling objects, or animals.

General Liability

Trucker’s general liability insurance can help to protect against claims of bodily injury or property damage caused by the typical daily use of a truck for business purposes. This coverage can help when claims are made against a driver or your business for the services you provide. From loading at a dock to work at a job site, having general liability is a basic first line of defense when it comes to protecting your business.

Cargo Insurance

Beyond protecting against people or buildings, flatbed truck insurance should also be purchased to protect the cargo involved in everyday business. The loads that are being carried are valuable as well as hefty and awkward to load. Cargo insurance is an option to add on that protects the loads of cargo you’re hauling against things like theft, fire, or collision.

About Western Truck Insurance Services

Western Truck Insurance Services is a commercial truck insurance agency with roots dating back to 1954. We have evolved into a highly respected, professionally managed, truck and transportation insurance brokerage. The hallmark of our organization is our desire to provide unparalleled service. We go way beyond what you expect to receive from an insurance brokerage. Equipped with state of the art automation, Western Truck Insurance can provide you with lightning fast truck insurance quotes, customer service, Insurance certificates, and coverage changes.

Truck Stop Cargo Thefts: What Can Be Done

Cargo theft of freight trucks on the road has always been a prevalent threat to freight companies. And even though numbers are down, with the uptick in e-commerce and electronics pose a potential threat for trucking companies and their clients. Drivers will park their truck at a stop, go inside to rest, and then come out to an empty parking spot.

According to data, there were 157 cargo thefts reported in the second quarter of 2018 in the United States and Canada. The average cargo value per theft event came in at $187,000, totaling $29.3 million in losses in that quarter alone. With this in mind, it’s important to note how to minimize these risks. Here are some tips to do so.

Understand How Cargo Theft Occurs

The most important part of preventing cargo theft is by understanding how it occurs. With new ELD regulations set, truck drivers have to take more frequent stops, opening up more opportunities for theft to occur when they’re stopped. There are things drivers can do to protect cargo when they are stopped. Another thing to consider is understanding what is targeted, such as pharmaceuticals, food, and electronics.

Be Aware of Your Surroundings

Employers should provide training to prevent cargo theft and to know how to respond if drivers are put in a situation where freight is stolen. There should be a culture of education and security in every freight company, and all employees should be aware of cargo theft and hijacking.

Drivers should pay attention to their surroundings when they are stopped at a rest stop or truck stop. Be aware while your truck is parked and inquire with truck stop management as to the security on premises, including surveillance cameras and guards. Keep your truck in sights of the cameras as any footage may be able to capture the license plate or face of a thief or thieves.

Insure Your Truck

Trucking companies can protect not only the goods they are hauling but the drivers and the actual trucks themselves. Comprehensive motor truck cargo insurance is a full-spectrum approach to protecting these entities in the event of a theft. After you’re left picking up the pieces, so to speak, having motor truck cargo insurance in place will provide financial restoration after a loss.

Use Technology

GPS tracking devices and security seals are becoming more commonplace and prices are becoming more and more reasonable. GPS tracking devices can be placed on the vehicle and trailer as well as the goods inside the truck. If your truck falls victim to theft, it’s likely that a full loss won’t be taken and you may be able to recover some of all of the items that were taken.

It’s also important to use technology to boost communication between drivers and security in the company. If cargo is left unattended for a period of time, this should be made known. There are many different available resources available to keep trucks and trailers secure.

About Western Truck Insurance Services

Western Truck Insurance Services is a commercial truck insurance agency with roots dating back to 1954. We have evolved into a highly respected, professionally managed, truck and transportation insurance brokerage. The hallmark of our organization is our desire to provide unparalleled service. We go way beyond what you expect to receive from an insurance brokerage. Equipped with state of the art automation, Western Truck Insurance can provide you with lightning fast truck insurance quotes, customer service, Insurance certificates, and coverage changes.