Winter’s Coming- Driving Tips to Help You Travel with Care

If you need a reprieve from hot summer temperatures, relief is on the way. Winter is definitely coming and temperatures are dropping around the country. Plummeting temperatures present some unique challenges in the truck. Here’s our guide for safe winter driving. Do you have any tips to add to the list?

How Does Weather Impact Safety on the Road?

Each year more than 1.2 million crashes are caused by bad weather, approximately 22% of all accidents. Weather related accidents include those that occur in adverse weather (rain, sleet, snow, fog, etc.) or on slick pavement (icy, snowy, wet). On average 6,000 people are killed each year and 445,000 injured by weather related crashes. Yes, bad weather can occur any time of the year, but it is much more likely during the winter.

Watch Out for Water

Rain and wet pavement are some of the biggest dangers for winter driving. Icy pavement and snow certainly cause crashes, but wet pavement is responsible for the majority. The Federal Highway Administration has found that wet pavement plays a role in 73% of weather related crashes, 80% of weather related injuries, and 77% of weather related fatalities. When it is wet, be extra cautious as this is one of the most dangerous times to be on the road.

Give Yourself Extra Time

Winter driving isn’t going to be as productive as summer driving, especially during bad weather. Plan your routes accordingly and give yourself extra time when estimating arrival times for dropping and loading. It is estimated that 23% of non-recurrent delays are due to snow, ice, and fog. Overall, 12% of total truck delay is due to weather and trucking companies lose about 32 billion hours each year due to weather related delays. During peak travel periods in Washington D.C. travel times increase approximately 24% in the presence of precipitation. Plan accordingly when winter weather is expected.

Prepare for Weather

Winter weather can leave you stranded on the side of the highway when roads get shut down or conditions are too dangerous to continue. You can’t always count on making it to the next truck stop. Stock your truck with the supplies you’ll need for a day or two of delay, just in case. Make sure you have appropriate winter clothing, including coats, hats, and gloves, ready. Keep extra food, water, and blankets in your truck. Fill up your fuel more often (try to keep at least half a tank at all times) and keep extra wiper fluid on hand. Tire chains and a windshield scraper are winter must-haves.

Watch for Ice

If you’ve ever experienced black ice, you know how scary it can be. Slick ice that comes out of nowhere, black ice is very difficult to spot. When the temperatures drop near freezing, be aware that black ice is possible and be very cautious if the road looks wet, as it may actually be ice. Bridges are especially prone to black ice. Be careful!

Don’t Be Afraid to Shut Down

We know you have deadlines to make and places to go, but getting to a drop on time isn’t worth sacrificing your safety. If you do run into weather conditions where driving is unsafe, stop and give the storm time to pass. Good communication with all parties involved will help to alleviate problems caused by winter delays. Keep everyone informed about where you are and what’s happening. Your safety this winter is a priority.

A little extra caution in the winter can help you stay safe on the road as temperatures drop. Travel with care this winter and beyond.

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